Wheels 29 inches bike how much to swing

Maneuverability

Bicycles with 27.5-inch wheels are more maneuverable.

A bike with 29-inch wheels is more flexible due to the lengthening of the frame, which comes with larger wheel sizes. This can make it harder to handle in tight turns.

29″ vs 27.5″ Wheels Which should you buy?

For regular riding on narrow, winding trails, a bike with 27.5 “wheels is fine, as they give the feel of riding the original 26” while retaining many of the benefits of large wheels.

Bikes with 29-inch wheels are easier to navigate over obstacles. They are easier to ride over rocky mountains and tree roots than to quickly maneuver between them.

A visual comparison table for bicycles with wheel sizes 27.5 and 29 inches:

27.5 “ 29 “
Acceleration Fast Highly efficient
Clutch Sufficient The best
Attack angle Sufficient Best
Weight Easier Heavier
Maneuverability Best Good
Fit for the cyclist Suitable for short cyclists Suitable for tall cyclists

Go for a test drive: when choosing between bicycles with different wheel sizes, you must remember that the final decision should be made only after you have tried the bike yourself and felt the difference between them.

Clutch

29-inch tires have a larger contact area, which means more grip.

27.5 inches: These wheels provide good traction and are suitable for most purposes. Other criteria such as acceleration or weight may ultimately be more important factors when choosing a wheel size.

29 ”: These large-area wheels are the best choice for climbing steep cliffs and forests with tree roots growing above the ground.

Attack angle

29 inch wheels move over obstacles easier than others. Is the angle that forms when a round wheel touches a square object. A smaller angle is better because the wheel can move over an object more easily.

27.5 “: These wheels are not capable of overcoming obstacles as easily as the 29” wheels, but they also have a lot of advantages. Think about where you will be driving. If the main routes are on flat roads, then 27.5-inch wheels are better than others.

29 “: These wheels have a slightly shallower angle of attack than 27.5″ wheels to help them better handle obstacles such as logs, tree roots and rocks. Many riders feel much more confident when riding large wheels.

Smaller wheels have less weight. And nothing can be done about it, the larger the size of the wheels, the heavier they will be. A bike with 29 “wheels will weigh almost a kilogram more than one with 27.5” wheels. Depending on the intended type of riding, the weight of the bike may be very important or not at all.

For ordinary cyclists: the difference in wheel weights is not as important as, for example, thrust or angle of attack. Cyclists or cyclists who are going on a long journey are likely to look for ways to reduce weight. Choosing a bike with smaller wheels is a great way to reduce weight, but it’s not the only one. For this, there are bicycles with an ultralight frame, handlebar, saddle and carbon fiber rims.

Using tubeless wheels is a great way to reduce weight. Tubeless wheels not only reduce the overall weight of the bike, they also accelerate faster.

Acceleration

Bicycles with 27.5 “wheels accelerate much faster than 29″ bicycles, which are more efficient over long distances. Small wheels accelerate faster than large ones. This is mainly due to the distribution of the total weight of the wheel. On large wheels, the weight of spokes, rims, tubes and the tires are placed far from the center of the wheel, resulting in more rotating mass and slower acceleration.

27.5 “: Fast acceleration is often the biggest advantage of 27.5” wheels over 29 “wheels. Fast acceleration wheels give the bike the responsiveness and energy that many riders desire.

29 inches: slow acceleration wheels will take a lot of time to accelerate to the desired speed. However, after the wheels reach their maximum speed, they become much more efficient than the smaller ones, since over long distances less effort is needed to maintain the rotational speed.

or 29 inches: which wheels are best for a mountain bike?

For years no one paid attention to the wheel size when buying a bicycle, as they all came with standard 26-inch wheels. Recently, however, two new wheel sizes have emerged that have surpassed the standard sizes in terms of performance.

The first to come out were 29-inch wheels, and a few years later they started selling 27.5-inch wheels. Choosing the right size mainly depends on what is expected of the mountain bike, as well as the terrain that you are going to ride.

Fit for the cyclist

Bicycles with 29-inch wheels are often suitable for tall cyclists.

Huge 29 “wheels affect the geometry of the bike frame more than 27.5″ wheels. This makes it difficult for short cyclists (less than 168cm tall) to find a suitable bike with 29 ” wheels.

Tall cyclists, especially those taller than 183 cm, prefer bicycles with 29-inch wheels. However, a bike with 27.5-inch wheels would be just as good for them, so before choosing one or another bike, you first need to decide on the priorities, which is more important: acceleration, weight, angle of attack or grip.

What to pump up

Bicycle luggage requires maintenance and pumping very often. Even on the most “hardy” city and mountain bikes, it is required to check and pump up the camera every 2-3 weeks, since the air leaks not only through the nipple, but also simply through the rubber. High pressure “helps” air molecules find their way through an insufficiently dense chamber.

“City”, or, simply, budget bicycles, it is enough to pump up once every 2-4 weeks, mountain bikes. at least once every two weeks, road bikes. once a week, and road and sports bikes. before each trip.

Therefore, the pump is not only an emergency accessory that is used only when a punctured wheel is changed, but also a necessary part of the preparation for departure. Active cyclists should consider purchasing two pumps:

  • portable. as part of an emergency kit or on long trips;
  • stationary with a stop and a pressure gauge. for periodic maintenance of your tires.

By the way, an ordinary car pump perfectly takes the place of a stationary pump. It is also suitable for bicycles, shows, shows exactly how many atmospheres are pumped up, and does not take up additional space. Some people prefer to pump up on “professional” pumps at gas stations, but the lack of their professional tool can play a bad joke in the event of an unexpected situation or when you deviate from the standard route.

Pressure effect

In fact, the optimal tire pressure of a bicycle is a purely individual parameter, which each biker varies within certain limits for himself: for his riding style, for the planned route and the current level of training. The limits are set by technological constraints, which we will consider further.

Here are the main factors to consider when choosing an inflation level:

  • high pressure gives “roll”. rolling speed, saving the strength of the cyclist;
  • excessively high, in turn, can provoke a breakdown of the chamber against the rim from the inside;
  • similarly, low pressure leads to “snake bites”, when a rim on an obstacle or bump pierces the chamber at two points at once and reaches the tire;
  • low pressure prevents damage to mechanisms on numerous bumps;
  • at low pressure better “grip” and easier to move on rough terrain.

Taking into account all the pros and cons, a single recommendation can be made: the wheels should be inflated enough to provide good traction and not damage the camera. For this, there are standards for what pressure is considered acceptable. We will consider them further.

Seasonal changes

Seasonal adjustments are quite serious, mainly related to mountain bikes. In the summer, you should slightly underestimate the pumping and not rest on the maximum. Hot asphalt also heats up the air inside the chamber, which increases the volume and therefore the pressure. Also, a pumped-over tire wears out very quickly.

In winter, you should sometimes slightly exceed the maximum in order to achieve maximum work from the tread, especially if the rubber is selected with spikes.

How to check the pressure after inflation

The exact value can only be checked with a pressure gauge. Therefore, you need a pump with a pressure gauge or a separate electronic bicycle pressure gauge. You can go to a car service to check the pressure and pump up the wheels. But before pumping up your bike with a car pump, think about it. After all, the auto repairman may not pay attention to the pressure and ruin your tires.

Experienced cyclists can measure pressure by eye. You can inflate tires with a pressure gauge, memorize the value and squeeze the tire with your fingers. Remember the feeling, so you learn to understand how inflated your wheels are.

What is written on the tires

The secret to making the right choice is very simple: just look at the inflated wheel. Next to the information about the size of the tire, there will also be information about the permissible pressure range in the chamber.

Why is this information not shown on the camera itself? Because in it the only point subject to real stress is the nipple, and its mechanism is very reliable. Otherwise, the normal pressure, which increases by an order of magnitude during fast skiing, is taken by the tire, and how much it will be compressed is the main limitation.

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So, if the pressure is too low, the tire will break closer to the rim, bite the chamber, leading to a breakdown, and if it is too low, it may just burst on one of the bumps or when driving on hot asphalt.

BIKE TIRE PRESSURE WHAT SHOULD BE AND WHAT TO RUN?

Every bike lover is obliged to monitor the condition of his two-wheeled horse. It is from this that its service life and ride comfort will envy. When you go on your next trip, do not forget to measure your tire pressure. This procedure is mandatory, because the comfort while driving directly depends on it.

Oddly enough, first of all, the quality of cycling, especially on asphalt, depends on the pressure in the wheels of the bike. Under-inflated wheels easily break through and dampen a large percentage of the cyclist’s efforts, while over-inflated wheels can damage the camera and lead to its rapid wear. Accurate knowledge and experience of skiing will help you find the middle ground.

Many are accustomed to checking tire pressure using the old-fashioned method with their fingers. However, this method is very imprecise, and the concept of a “well-inflated wheel” can be very different for every cyclist. That is why it is better to always have a pressure gauge on hand to accurately determine the tire pressure.

  • Pressure effect
  • Theoretical knowledge
  • What is written on the tires
  • How is blood pressure measured?
  • Markings
  • Important Factors
  • How riding style and tire pressure depend.
  • What to pump up
  • Standard pressure
  • Children’s bicycles
  • Seasonal changes
  • Weight changes
  • Approximate values ​​by type of rubber
  • How to check the pressure after inflation
  • Determining factors
  • Conclusion
  • Video
  • Question answer

What is written on the tires

The secret to making the right choice is very simple: just look at the inflated wheel. Next to the information about the size of the tire, there will also be information about the permissible pressure range in the chamber.

Why is this information not shown on the camera itself? Because in it the only point subject to real stress is the nipple, and its mechanism is very reliable. Otherwise, the normal pressure, which increases by an order of magnitude during fast skiing, is taken by the tire, and how much it will be compressed is the main limitation.

So, if the pressure is too low, the tire will break closer to the rim, bite the chamber, leading to a breakdown, and if it is too low, it may just burst on one of the bumps or when driving on hot asphalt.

What to pump up

Bicycle luggage requires maintenance and pumping very often. Even on the most “hardy” city and mountain bikes, it is required to check and pump up the camera every 2-3 weeks, since the air leaks not only through the nipple, but also simply through the rubber. High pressure “helps” air molecules find their way through an insufficiently dense chamber.

“City”, or, simply, budget bicycles, it is enough to pump up once every 2-4 weeks, mountain bikes. at least once every two weeks, road bikes. once a week, and road and sports bikes. before each trip.

Therefore, the pump is not only an emergency accessory that is used only when a punctured wheel is changed, but also a necessary part of the preparation for departure. Active cyclists should consider purchasing two pumps:

  • portable. as part of an emergency kit or on long trips;
  • stationary with a stop and a pressure gauge. for periodic maintenance of your tires.

By the way, an ordinary car pump perfectly takes the place of a stationary pump. It is also suitable for bicycles, shows, shows exactly how many atmospheres are pumped up, and does not take up additional space. Some people prefer to pump up on “professional” pumps at gas stations, but the lack of their professional tool can play a bad joke in the event of an unexpected situation or when you deviate from the standard route.

Approximate values ​​by type of rubber

You can also give recommendations for inflating wheels with different tires.

For slicks and semi-slick, the use of pressure below the maximum is allowed only in hot weather. a shortage by a quarter already negates the entire effect of such rubber, because it is “sharpened” for the maximum diameter and lack of resistance.

Classic cross-country treads with a width of 2-2.3 inches inflate to 3-4 BAR, depending on the track and habit, a lower value will make riding a strength training, and higher values ​​are simply not allowed by manufacturers, as they lead to a real “explosion” when peak load.

Extreme tires, whether downhill 2.3 wide tricky treads, or BMX stunt models should be inflated medium, between high and low to have sufficient traction, and then subtly varied for each trick or downhill.

Standard pressure

Here are some tables that will help you navigate in difficult situations, namely:

  • an unknown tire without markings was purchased;
  • no physical access to the bike;
  • the marking is incomprehensible, the numbers are marked in unknown units.

For a road bike, the pressure should be much higher, and typically ranges between 6.5. 9 atmospheres (up to 130 Psi), up to the maximum indicated by the manufacturer.

Markings

What do they write on the tires? For example, (2.38-4.0) is clearly atmospheres, or BAR, and (95-135) is Psi. If the figure has more than 3 digits or the prefix “k” (kilo), we are talking about metric Pascal. Most often, the desired value is located under the size designation and is duplicated in BAR and Psi in the form of a range, clearly indicating to what pressure you can pump.

Actually, the manufacturer indicates the range within which the tire can function, then. the freedom of the cyclist.

Wheels 29 inches bike how much to swing

Translation: Alain Khairullin, negonki website. ru.

Bicycles with 29 “wheels (so-called niners) are a generation of mountain bikes that evoke new emotions compared to 26”. Compared to competitors, they look like clown (or even old man’s) bikes. But, undoubtedly, opponents of large wheels did not drive them enough to have grounds for condemnation.

Back in 1986, Dr. Alex Molton, known for his comfortable compact bikes, made an all-terrain bike with 20 “wheels. Unfortunately, Moulton ATB made a strategic mistake. Their 20 “wheels caught any, even the smallest depressions and potholes that you would not even notice when sitting in the saddle of a 26” bike. So despite the comfort and handling of Molton’s suspension in the fully rigid mountain bike era, his all-terrain bikes didn’t last long.

If you’ve ever ridden a BMX on the right mountain track, you know how it feels. The smaller wheels not only provide a shorter wheelbase, but also roll worse over bumps. That is, other things being equal, large wheels run over bumps more easily. But can we assume that they will roll faster across the intersection as a whole? Not always. difficulties arise where, it would seem, 26 “and 29” bicycles are the same.

Is the hype around 29ers worth your attention? First, determine the nature of the sensations that you want to get from travel.

Let’s take a pendant. In theory, all varieties, including thick tires, make the road appear smoother. But it is harder to fit the suspension around a 29 ”wheel than on a 26”. Without revising the frame, there simply isn’t enough room for it. In addition, larger wheels require different geometry for the bike to perform at its best.

Large wheels and tires are also heavier, so they accelerate worse. And although it is easier for them to move over obstacles, in other cases they will roll more slowly. Smaller wheels are easier to spin, but larger ones retain torque longer. Thus, without even going into the intricacies of geometry, it is not easy to say unequivocally that large wheels roll softer, so they are better.

The mountain bike market is now dominated by 26 ”wheels. They are a worthy compromise for mid-sized riders on uneven tracks with wide tires. Plus, they fit into the standard frame, leaving ample dirt clearance.

To the uninitiated, the size of a mountain bike wheel is the diameter from the surface of the tire to the surface of the tire. However, tire heights vary, so it is extremely rare for a wheel and tire to form exactly 26 ”inches. Large tires with spacious air chambers can go up to 27.5 inches in diameter, some don’t even fit in suspension forks or between frame stays.

The fact that the athletes on the niners look differently cannot be denied.

The 650B wheels are lighter and stronger than 29 “wheels, and the frames usually look sleeker under them than the 29” (with large clearances), which are quite lanky. Undoubtedly, 29 “and 27.5”, with ample support from the rim and tire manufacturers, are good solutions for the comfort connoisseur, especially in the absence of a suspension fork. Such wheels will be comfortable for tall cyclists. this is also not objectionable.

In short, for the average cyclist, 26 “wheels will continue to dominate the market for the foreseeable future, but 29” wheels are already undergoing revolutionary popularity. Now let’s see why big wheels are becoming more common.

When the first mass-produced 29ers came along, they showed their potential right away, but their spread was slowed by the limited choice of suspension forks and geometry that tried to resemble 26 ”frames.

Gary Fischer’s early designs called Genesis were already promising, however, it was only in the last couple of years that engineers began to really understand the differences between ideal 26 “geometry and ideal 29” geometry. That this is not just a game of angular degrees; the length of the fork, stem, top tube and bottom bracket all contribute to the overall stability and ride comfort of the finished bike.

And that’s not to mention the pros and cons of longer stays, wheelbases, tire contact patches that affect the bike’s grip. The 29ers are still working on these elements, as well as the 26 ”.

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XC riders are switching to niners to experience previously inaccessible terrain

The move to big wheels reflects the general love for fast racing on bumpy tracks. The rolling advantages of large wheels did not necessarily provide an overall speed boost for experienced riders on the proposed XC, but the more we rode them, the more we felt that the best specimens significantly increased comfort and confidence on these rugged trails.

Remember, the increased convenience and comfort can also add speed simply because you are “good” on the track. This may be the reason for the great success of several fragile female athletes in the Cross Country World Cup Niners. It turns out that sometimes the 29ers are simply easier to ride. However, let’s first listen to what people are discussing at 26 “and 29”.

Effective diameters of 26 “and 29” are measured between tire surfaces on opposite sides of the wheel and vary widely. A high profile tire fitted to a 26 ”wheel can be 27” or larger. High-profile tires roll softer than low-profile tires and therefore offer greater comfort and traction benefits.

The less common 650Bs are 27.5 “edge-to-edge diameters to fit into most 26” frames and forks. Some fork manufacturers modify the height of the gorilla on newer models, so you can decide for yourself whether to fit 26 ”or 650B wheels.

Why rolling is smoother?

The main reason is that the larger rims roll more gently in relation to the obstacle. Try rolling a gymnastic hoop down the street, and then do the same with a napkin ring. Of course, there are certain differences, but you will understand what is the point here.

The large circle is not so vulnerable to bumps and depressions, because forms a kind of bridge between the sharp edges of obstacles. This is why climbing down stairs is more difficult on a BMX than on a mountain bike. In short, the wheel must be large enough to fill the spaces between the edges of the holes and roll over them like a ramp.

26 “versus 29”. a slight difference, but a completely different perception of the road

What about traction?

wheels, inches, bike, much, swing

There is a lot of rumor surrounding the difference in ground grip between the 29 “and 26”. If the rider first sits on 26 “and then on 29”, then with the same tire pressure, the length of the contact area of ​​the tire with the surface will theoretically be the same. However, in practice, even when using tires with the same tread from the same manufacturer, the difference between volume and shape will create a larger grip patch on a 29 ”tire.

There are many factors to consider here. A typical 29er will appear more stable compared to a 26 ”. This is partly because the larger wheels require a longer wheelbase with a larger rear triangle. This can be achieved with 26 “, but this is rarely used.

Another reason for stability is that the 29 ”axles are 1.5 inches taller and the person sits closer to the center of the axles than 26”. Therefore, despite the fact that the center of gravity of the 29 “rider is higher than that of the 26” (when viewed from the side), the 29 “rides more stable due to the location of the rider’s body weight below the wheel axles.

When it comes to handling in the context of frame geometry, engineers are gradually moving towards lowering the fork height to improve the handling of the niners. This, combined with the expansion of the range of quality forks, casts doubt on the 29 “lag from 26” in technical sections of the track.

Key to the popularity of niners: lower curvature angles, which means more flotation.

Why didn’t all the riders get on them??

The 2009 and 2010 US women’s and men’s cross-country marathons were won by niners. Several of the Trek riders started skating noticeably better after moving to the 29 ”. Todd Wells won two July US championships in his 2011 full suspension Specialized Epic. What’s more, riders like Willow Kerber and Heather Irmiger have shown us that big wheels work for short people too.

Coincidence? Possibly, but look at the results. It seems that the famous conservative views of athletes about cross-country bicycles have begun to change, although this, at times, seems to be a desire to please sponsors.

Who are 29ers best suited for??

While several manufacturers are experimenting with larger wheels on downhill bikes and an increasing number of XC riders are using these wheels, isn’t all this hype just another marketing gimmick, or is 29 “really better than 26” for some riders? In this context, we have covered most of the controversial issues and come to the conclusion that it depends on the personal preferences of each.

Riders who like the 29er’s softer ride over bumps may end up going a little faster, while those who fear worsening acceleration will believe they are going slower. But towards the end of the race, well-being begins to play a major role, rather than speed indicators.

We asked several of our test riders, as well as those closely involved in the production process, what they think of the 29 ”versus 26” opposition. And this is what they told us.

James Huang, Technical Editor for BikeRadar USA

The two niners brought some notable advantages as well as competition when it comes to designing frames, forks and other components. The larger diameter is inherent in the increased mass and inertia, the increased tendency of the wheel to bend, and the longer (and therefore more flexible) frame tubes. But innovations like widened bushings and flanges, stiffer and lighter rims, and through dropouts level the playing field. Some manufacturers such as Specialized have already integrated all three of these finds into their impressive Epic Carbon.

The tires must be different too. The Finnish company Wheel Energy during testing revealed the fact that the contact patch on the 29 “is longer and narrower in comparison with the 26” wheel. Because of this, the effectiveness of the side tread blocks can be impaired, and the 29 ”tire touches the ground with a large number of center blocks at any given time.

For the nominal performance of the task, it is enough to apply the know-how on 26 ”bicycles to the niners, however, to make a breakthrough, you need to have flexible thinking. We can both grieve about the 29 ”inherent shortcomings and take full advantage of the benefits. And as soon as we start doing this, 29ers will immediately become even more popular.

Mike Hall, design engineer

As soon as I first heard about 29 “, I goggled and shaking my head thought:” These crazy hucksters. what else have they come up with? ” My spontaneous impression of niners as worthless crafts only intensified when I saw a short athlete in the saddle. “If it’s so fashionable now, please,” I thought then. This is how my point of view was born. 29 ”looked wrong.

Now imagine the depth of my frustration when they started winning! The guys on the niners started kicking my ass. Looking at them with different eyes, I noticed a certain elegance where before there was only an ugly frame with a flattened glass and awkward proportions. But engineers may have groped the right way in their design.

John Stephenson, Editor-in-Chief of Cycling, Future Publishing

The idea of ​​29 ”is not that revolutionary. Yes, in theory, big wheels roll faster, but the difference is lost in the mass of other characteristics of the bike. Some of the advantages are either completely elusive, or can be reproduced on 26 ”bikes. For example, the 29 ”is ideal for tall riders because of its long stays and wheelbase, so the weight is distributed like a mid-sized 26” rider. But just take and lengthen the feathers from the 26 “!

The belief that 29 “has a larger contact patch and better grip stems from a misunderstanding of physics. If you weigh 80 kg (180 lbs) with your bike and the tires are inflated to 2 atm (30 psi), then the weight is distributed at 40 cm2 (6 in2) per tire, regardless of tire size. Larger wheels are said to be more stable due to the increased torque. And tests, meanwhile, have shown that torque has a very mediocre effect on stability. Here the topography of the track, the angle of the steering and the lunge of the fork are more important.

Freedom of choice is always great, so if you love your 29er, ride it with your pleasure and be happy. But it is not necessary to argue that this is a huge step forward. the results of the races and physics refute this.

Matt Paekoka, BikeRadar USA Editor

I don’t consider myself a serious cross-country rider anymore. If that were the case, then I would ride the Niner all the time. no doubt. Instead, I’m torn between three bikes, all of which perform well throughout the season.

The first is a 29 ”hardtail. It is made of aluminum and is race oriented. Weighs less than 11 kilograms, which is quite small, allows you to quickly accelerate and not give up before climbing. After buying (and not just testing) this 29er over a year ago, I can confidently say that I have no reason to buy a 26 ”hardtail for mountain riding, neither racing nor friendly.

My second bike is 100mm full suspension. I usually choose it for cross-country racing not so much because it is faster than 29 ”, but because it is just fun. It weighs more than a 29 ”hardtail, and it climbs into the mountains without a light. Depending on how the 2011 season plays out, I might consider replacing it with a bike with larger wheels.

Finally, my third bike is a relatively light 150mm off-roader designed for fun rather than fast turns. It has 26 ”wheels with wide tires and is the nicest to ride, you just have to deal with the fact that it doesn’t roll well up the slopes. Here I do not see the advantage of large wheels. This would make the bike heavier, and because of the long suspension travel, it would feel less stable and passable.

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The moral of my story is that every bike stable owner should add 29 ”. For those whose main goal is to participate in cross-country races, whether friendly or professional, I see the transition to 29 “as a significant advantage.

Oli Backingsale, professional cross-country racer

I can see the advantage of large wheels in rolling, but these wheels are always heavier. I really like my Giant Anthem X and am aware of the development of the 29 ”Anthem X, however, the speed loss due to weight will be higher compared to my hardtail.

Don’t forget about spare parts. I have a lot of 26 “wheels and tires and with 29” it will get even bigger. The solution is a complete transition to the new system, which is very serious. Therefore, I, perhaps, will provide sponsors with a solution to this issue.

Guy Kesteven, BikeRadar tester

Bikes with big wheels are rubbish. They are sluggish, pliable, heavy, designed for lanky or elderly cyclists who want to attract attention, as well as beginners who cannot ride. I love to hear all this, because this is how I manage to keep my harmless scam a secret.

Quite frankly, some poorly designed units are complete rubbish. Even good samples do not allow making complex tricks, they accelerate sluggishly, they can get stuck in narrow places. This means that they will never suit absolutely everyone.

If you ask me which bike is the fastest on a long, bumpy, technical track, my immediate answer is “Niner.” Especially after testing the 2011 models. Bigger wheels mean less shaking, more torque and more confidence when going through technical sections.

They maintain speed and traction on uphills or in sharp turns. Good 29 “hardtails are similar to 100mm 26” hangers. A good 100mm 29er suspension fits most 26 ”with 152mm of travel on high speed, rocky descents. Change the slow rider from 26 “to 29” and he will go better. And this is not advertising or speculation. I’ve seen this in group races, at endurance races, and now at the XC World Cup. Better if people don’t believe me. it will allow me to kick their asses for a while.

High lug tires

All toothed tires designed for travel on soft ground, sand, snow are best used with high pressure. In this case, the adhesion will be maximum.

Half slick

For semi-slickers, it is important to choose the right pressure for the very surface on which the bike rides.

wheels, inches, bike, much, swing

Riding on a hard surface. asphalt and rolled primer. At low pressures, all the benefits of these tires are lost. A properly inflated semi-slick should roll on a hard surface with the smooth part of the tread. And on soft ground, side lugs are included in the work. At low pressure, the tire will flatten and grip the hard surface with the side lugs, creating additional resistance and wearing out faster.

When driving on soft ground, it is better to reduce the pressure. The low pressure cushions bumps in the road and makes off-road driving more comfortable. In this case, the contact area of ​​the wheel with the road increases, which, accordingly, leads to an improvement in grip. This is especially felt on descents and sharp turns.

When riding on sand or snow, it is better to increase the pressure. it will improve grip and control of the bike.

Bicycle tire pressure versus cyclist weight

This should be immediately clarified. The pressure in the tires of a road bike always varies between 6.5-9 BAR (up to 130 PSI) and does not depend very much on the weight of the cyclist.

The pressure in mountain bikes is always lower.

Here is a table showing the dependence of the pressure in the wheels of a mountain and city bike on the weight of the biker:

You can focus on the following. for each additional kilogram of weight, the pressure should be increased by 1%.

The pressure in the tire directly affects its durability. Riding on badly inflated tires wears them out quickly.

Additional tips for choosing the right pressure:

When choosing the right tire pressure for your bike, you should also pay attention to factors such as:

  • The surface you are rolling on. So, when driving on rough terrain, soil or sand, it is enough to inflate the tires just above the minimum value, so the grip will be better. When driving on asphalt and flat surfaces, it is better to choose a value close to the maximum. this will improve the roll forward.
  • Your bike type. Depending on the type of your bike, we recommend using different pressures. For a mountain bike, this value should be lower than for a sports road bike, for example. The principle here is that the narrower the tire, the higher the pressure in it should be. And vice versa.
  • Outside temperature. In the heat, it is better not to pump the wheels to the maximum, because the air in the chamber heats up and the pressure rises additionally. And in winter, even when riding on snow, the pressure should not be lower than average in order to achieve maximum grip of the tread.
  • User weight. Inflate the wheels more if you are heavy or carry heavy loads on your bike.

To summarize, it should be noted that there are no hard and fast rules for how many atmospheres should be in your wheels. And the right answer will be your accumulated experience.!

Unfortunately, bicycle theft is not uncommon these days. Especially when it comes to a large metropolis with busy streets and a large population.

At the time of buying a bike, you should pay special attention to the choice of a saddle, because a lot depends on its size and shape, including your safety.

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27.5″ Vs 29″ Mountain Bike Wheels | The Wheel Size Debate Continues

Wheel pressure depends on:

The pressure for which the tire is designed is indicated by the manufacturer directly on it.

The inscription in English “Inflate to. “Literally translates as” Inflate up. “(” Pump up “,” Pressure from. To. “).

For example, the figure indicates that the pressure should be from 36 to 60 PSI (from 250 to 420 kPa) or, respectively, from 2.5 atmospheres to 4.2 atmospheres.

What to pump up

Bicycle luggage requires maintenance and pumping very often. Even on the most “hardy” city and mountain bikes, it is required to check and pump up the camera every 2-3 weeks, since the air leaks not only through the nipple, but also simply through the rubber. High pressure “helps” air molecules find their way through an insufficiently dense chamber.

“City”, or, simply, budget bicycles, it is enough to pump up once every 2-4 weeks, mountain bikes. at least once every two weeks, road bikes. once a week, and road and sports bikes. before each trip.

Therefore, the pump is not only an emergency accessory that is used only when a punctured wheel is changed, but also a necessary part of the preparation for departure. Active cyclists should consider purchasing two pumps:

  • portable. as part of an emergency kit or on long trips;
  • stationary with a stop and a pressure gauge. for periodic maintenance of your tires.

By the way, an ordinary car pump perfectly takes the place of a stationary pump. It is also suitable for bicycles, shows, shows exactly how many atmospheres are pumped up, and does not take up additional space. Some people prefer to pump up on “professional” pumps at gas stations, but the lack of their professional tool can play a bad joke in the event of an unexpected situation or when you deviate from the standard route.

Slicks

For driving on asphalt and well-rolled dirt roads, you need to pump up the maximum pressure.

Slick wheels are the easiest to swing for road and city bikes. Due to the fact that they have a small volume of wheels, the pressure must be high. The more pressure, the better the roll and the higher the speed. So swing boldly a little bit by 0.2. 0.4 under pumping to the maximum pressure indicated by the manufacturer on the tire, especially in hot weather.

What pressure should be in bicycle tires (how many atmospheres)

In this article, we will answer the question that many cyclists are asking: How much pressure should the tires of a bicycle be? We note right away that tire pressure is the most important factor that affects the flotation and roll rate of your bike. That is why the pressure in the wheels must be correct.

The required pressure will help you determine the allowable values ​​on the tires. All products, regardless of the manufacturer, must indicate the minimum and maximum allowable pressure. In rare cases, only one value is indicated. the maximum. Also, these values ​​can be specified in different units of measurement: P.S.I pressure in pounds (American designation) or BAR. pressure in bars or atmospheres. In the table below, we have compared all possible values ​​with a person’s weight so that you can easily determine the required pressure based on your weight.

A floor or hand pump with a pressure gauge will help you to correctly determine the pressure in the wheels. Be careful when using compressor pumps, as they deliver a large amount of air at a high speed, which can lead to an explosion of the chamber.