How to disassemble a shock absorber on a bicycle

How to disassemble a bike shock absorber

If you haven’t had periodic maintenance for your bike forks, don’t be surprised that your bike suspension fork will need to be repaired soon. But to do this, you first need to properly inspect this functional component. Adhere to these rules for caring for shock absorbers and they will not let you down in the future:

  • You need to change the oil in the cartridges every 4000-5000 km of run.
  • Oil seals are wiped and lubricated every 100-150 km.
  • Check the cuffs at least once a week during active use of the bicycle.
  • Periodically inspect the shock absorber fork surface for chips or cracks

It doesn’t matter where the fork is, which needs to be disassembled to inspect or repair the bike’s rear shock absorber, the device is identical. Follow the step-by-step instructions provided by the experts:

  • Gently flip the bike with the wheels up.
  • Remove the rim brake.
  • Dismantle the wheel located at the front or rear of the vehicle.
  • Remove the stem and tube.
  • Remove the reference size ring and remove the front or rear fork.
  • Unscrewing the bolts, as well as removing the damper, will facilitate the removal of the spring.
  • The sealing material (anthers and seals) should be picked up with a screwdriver. Now the shock absorber you are interested in is available for inspection, disassembly and repair.
  • If you need to lubricate the suspension, give preference to greases that can withstand high temperatures. Lubricate bushings and legs, it is better if the composition is transparent or contains silicone as the main substance.

Types of shock absorbers

often than not, a suspension fork can only be found at the front of the bike, so manufacturers take care of reducing the force of impacts on the front wheel. Rear detail eliminates the drive wheel force that the front fork could not hide.

Spring-loaded, characterized by special rigidity. do not provide dampers.

disassemble, shock, absorber, bicycle

With spring and elastomer. they consist of a metal spring and a rubber damper in the center of the fork. The forks are used in bicycles for traversing moderate to fine terrain. Significant disadvantages include the low resistance of the pin to cold temperatures.

Air. air is pumped into the plug, it just dampens the vibrations. However, over time, air penetrates through the smallest holes, how long such a shock absorber will last depends on the sealing characteristics of the cuffs.

Oil-filled. instead of a damper, the front and rear forks include an oil cartridge.

Good bike shock absorbers not only keep the vehicle parts intact, but also contribute to a comfortable ride. When faced with poor amortization on a two-wheeled bike, don’t panic as you can repair the front and rear forks with your own hands. Clean, lubricate and replace the anthers, seals, bushings and feet of the shock absorption system in time, and then the bike will enjoy long-term use.

Rear shock absorber, its device, adjustment and repair

There are different models of bicycle rear shock absorbers, but fundamentally, the principle of operation and basic settings are the same for most. Linear and progressive damping systems are available depending on the model.

It’s time to start repairing and adjusting the shock absorber, which is responsible for comfort while riding a two-wheeled vehicle. A common cause of shock absorber breakage is untimely or improper care.

Why you need rear bike shocks

Cyclists are divided into two types: hardtail riders and those who love comfort and safety. Lovers of a quiet ride must install a rear bicycle shock absorber. It is he who is considered the heart of the entire suspension of the bicycle, its correct selection and installation will significantly improve comfort and speed of movement on rough terrain.

How to properly adjust a bike’s rear shock

There are three main controls: preload, rebound, and compression. The latter is sometimes divided into slow and fast compression at the upper ends of the shock absorber.

Preload

Preload is the resistance the fork gives against your weight. The more your weight, the more preload you need. For coil spring shocks, this means more or less resilience, but for air shocks, this means more pressure.

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Compression damping emerges from the inside of the shock and regulates the flow of lubricant through the small holes. Compression damping only affects the shock absorber when compression occurs. it does not affect preload but can have a similar effect on the rear suspension.

The more pressure is applied, the more difficult it will be to steer. This is fine if you want the bike to ride smoothly, without bouncing, but the negative effect will be limited movement (see below). In fact, suspension lockout is just an extremely high amount of compression damping.

Recoil Damping. Similar to an internal compression system and affects the shock absorber when it returns to its natural position.

When you apply more recoil damping. the fork will return to its natural position more slowly. Slower return. or more compression on rebound. is required if you feel resistance from the bike, especially around corners or bumps, but if repetitive bounces feel tight. less damping is needed.

Lockout is the most common and uses the compression damping system extensively to effectively lock out the fork.

Lockout is useful when you are faced with long climbs or flat surfaces where you might want to put more effort into the ride. CTD or Ascent, Route, Descent is a slightly more advanced form of lockout that is set for the type of terrain you are driving. CTD. Fox specific term, but other manufacturers have comparable systems.

The climb mode acts like a lockout to a large extent, although it tends to give a lot of freedom of movement; Route or Ride Mode is a movement with a lot of resistance, for convenience when driving with a tighter compression; while downhill means the lock is fully active and will require less compression damping during use.

Internal organization

Having disassembled the front and rear shock absorbers, it is easy to determine the internal arrangement of the parts, including the springs and the damper. Thanks to the springs, when cycling with a rear shock absorber, shock loads are reduced to nothing, even if the terrain is bumpy and the speed is off scale. Dampers, in turn, dampen vibrations, provide stability and stabilize the vehicle on the road.

Dampers are always found on mountain bikes and speed bikes designed for cycling. Such devices are necessary if travel includes passing a route with bumps and pits. For this reason, you will not see shock absorbers on road and road bikes. But if a cyclist wants to retrofit a two-wheeled bike, he can do-it-yourself front and rear forks.

What is bike seatpost cushioning?

For many bicycle owners, it becomes a real discovery that experts say that good cushioning is also provided by the pin under the saddle.

Those looking to increase cycling comfort will fit the damping pin themselves. But on expensive two-wheeled vehicle models, it is built in by default. The device of the clever device includes a pipe, where there is an elastic spring, and a damper made of rubber. When the bike hits road bumps, the element moves vertically inside the pipe and successfully dampens vibrations.

The telescopic damped unit has a number of significant disadvantages:

  • blows are softened only along the axis of the pin, others remain the same;
  • springs and saddle sag.

Therefore, the designers have developed an analogue, which is called a parallelogram. The product consists of the following parts:

  • a pipe placed under the saddle;
  • levers fixed by hinges;
  • rubber damper centered between the levers.

Thanks to an unusual device, the seat is displaced along a smooth arc, while the elastomeric component changes and takes the desired position. The movement of parallelogram pins is much lower than that of telescopic models, at the same time, experts note them as durable and resistant to small bumps and irregularities, pits.

Good bike shock absorbers not only keep the vehicle parts intact, but also contribute to a comfortable ride. When faced with poor amortization on a two-wheeled bike, don’t panic as you can repair the front and rear forks with your own hands. Clean, lubricate and replace the anthers, seals, bushings and feet of the shock absorption system in time, and then the bike will enjoy long-term use.

How to adjust bike shock absorbers

The repair of the front shock absorbers on the bicycle, as well as the rear ones, cannot be considered complete if the work of the forks is not adjusted. To make cycling enjoyable and not annoying, you need to adjust the following parameters:

  • tighten the springs;
  • adjust the speed of compression and rebound to comfortable parameters.

It is better to tune in stages, otherwise it will not be easy to achieve well-coordinated operation of the shock absorber elements. Experts recommend that you first select the compression speed, then check this property while driving, and only then to regulate the rebound speed.

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When the damping system is not fine-tuned, malfunctions not only cause discomfort when riding a two-wheeled bike, but also impair the vehicle’s performance. There is an increased risk of bending wheels or damaging the frame. Suspension assembly after repair is carried out following the same instructions, only in reverse order.

How to adjust the rear suspension

Before starting the installation, you need to make sure. that you have all the tools you need.

It is best to make adjustments before riding, but carry tools for additional adjustments during the trip.

Preload setting

It’s good if you have an assistant. but you can install yourself on a wall or a hard surface.

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Measure the inside first. the shiny part that moves inside the case. Divide the value by four to get the best result.

For optimal performance, you need 25 percent drawdown. However, some more aggressive shocks, like those on downhill bikes, can be fitted with a maximum of 30 percent.

Most shocks have a small inflatable ring or stop to measure sag. if your bike doesn’t have one, you can tie an elastic band. Don’t use a cable and of course don’t leave it there; the dirt it collects in combination with hard plastic will scratch the surface and be expensive to fix.

Set the compression damping switch to the downhill or open position, remove the ring, gently place the bike and enter the riding position. Try not to shake the bike. you are picking up a constant weight.

Carefully check the level of subsidence. how far the ring has moved. If the sag is more or less than a quarter of the length, adjust the psi. For most cyclists using air shocks, 150 to 200 psi will give 25 percent sag, so if you don’t know how much pressure you have, reduce it to 150 psi. Then add or subtract 25 to 50 psi at a time until you reach 25 percent subsidence.

2.Adjust compression and damping

Depending on your shock model, you will have a CTD switch or suspension settings as well as damping settings. If you have a CTD, then just tweak it according to your current terrain; if you have settings, proceed as follows:

First, notice how much ‘clicks’ range in your settings. To do this, rotate the disc fully back and forth and count the clicks.

If you are unsure of the value you want, set the disks to medium. You can experiment to find the value you want.

Setting extreme values ​​is rarely suitable for cyclists. therefore, most set an intermediate value.

Memorize the route and the desired setting values, you will have a feeling of understanding the process of the suspension.

How to disassemble a bike shock absorber

If you haven’t had periodic maintenance for your bike forks, don’t be surprised that your bike suspension fork will need to be repaired soon. But to do this, you first need to properly inspect this functional component. Adhere to these rules for caring for shock absorbers and they will not let you down in the future:

  • You need to change the oil in the cartridges every 4000-5000 km of run.
  • Oil seals are wiped and lubricated every 100-150 km.
  • Check the cuffs at least once a week during active use of the bicycle.
  • Periodically inspect the shock absorber fork surface for chips or cracks

It doesn’t matter where the fork is, which needs to be disassembled to inspect or repair the bike’s rear shock absorber, the device is identical. Follow the step-by-step instructions provided by the experts:

  • Gently flip the bike with the wheels up.
  • Remove the rim brake.
  • Dismantle the wheel located at the front or rear of the vehicle.
  • Remove the stem and tube.
  • Remove the reference size ring and remove the front or rear fork.
  • Unscrewing the bolts, as well as removing the damper, will facilitate the removal of the spring.
  • The sealing material (anthers and seals) should be picked up with a screwdriver. Now the shock absorber you are interested in is available for inspection, disassembly and repair.
  • If you need to lubricate the suspension, give preference to greases that can withstand high temperatures. Lubricate bushings and legs, it is better if the composition is transparent or contains silicone as the main substance.

Rear shock absorber, its device, adjustment and repair

There are different models of bicycle rear shock absorbers, but fundamentally, the principle of operation and basic settings are the same for most. Linear and progressive damping systems are available depending on the model.

It’s time to start repairing and adjusting the shock absorber, which is responsible for comfort while riding a two-wheeled vehicle. A common cause of shock absorber breakage is untimely or improper care.

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How to properly adjust a bike’s rear shock

There are three main controls: preload, rebound, and compression. The latter is sometimes divided into slow and fast compression at the upper ends of the shock absorber.

Preload

Preload is the resistance the fork gives against your weight. The more your weight, the more preload you need. For coil spring shocks, this means more or less resilience, but for air shocks, this means more pressure.

Compression damping emerges from the inside of the shock and regulates the flow of lubricant through the small holes. Compression damping only affects the shock absorber when compression occurs. it does not affect preload but can have a similar effect on the rear suspension.

The more pressure is applied, the more difficult it will be to steer. This is fine if you want the bike to ride smoothly, without bouncing, but the negative effect will be limited movement (see below). In fact, suspension lockout is just an extremely high amount of compression damping.

Recoil Damping. Similar to an internal compression system and affects the shock absorber when it returns to its natural position.

When you apply more recoil damping. the fork will return to its natural position more slowly. Slower return. or more compression on rebound. is required if you feel resistance from the bike, especially around corners or bumps, but if repetitive bounces feel tight. less damping is needed.

Lockout is the most common and uses the compression damping system extensively to effectively lock out the fork.

Lockout is useful when you are faced with long climbs or flat surfaces where you might want to put more effort into the ride. CTD or Ascent, Route, Descent is a slightly more advanced form of lockout that is set for the type of terrain you are driving. CTD. Fox specific term, but other manufacturers have comparable systems.

The climb mode acts like a lockout to a large extent, although it tends to give a lot of freedom of movement; Route or Ride Mode is a movement with a lot of resistance, for convenience when driving with a tighter compression; while downhill means the lock is fully active and will require less compression damping during use.

What is bike seatpost cushioning?

For many bicycle owners, it becomes a real discovery that experts say that good cushioning is also provided by the pin under the saddle.

Those looking to increase cycling comfort will fit the damping pin themselves. But on expensive two-wheeled vehicle models, it is built in by default. The device of the clever device includes a pipe, where there is an elastic spring, and a damper made of rubber. When the bike hits road bumps, the element moves vertically inside the pipe and successfully dampens vibrations.

Basic rear shock service & maintenance for your mountain bike. Mountain Bike Action

The telescopic damped unit has a number of significant disadvantages:

  • blows are softened only along the axis of the pin, others remain the same;
  • springs and saddle sag.

Therefore, the designers have developed an analogue, which is called a parallelogram. The product consists of the following parts:

  • a pipe placed under the saddle;
  • levers fixed by hinges;
  • rubber damper centered between the levers.

Thanks to an unusual device, the seat is displaced along a smooth arc, while the elastomeric component changes and takes the desired position. The movement of parallelogram pins is much lower than that of telescopic models, at the same time, experts note them as durable and resistant to small bumps and irregularities, pits.

Types of shock absorbers

often than not, a suspension fork can only be found at the front of the bike, so manufacturers take care of reducing the force of impacts on the front wheel. Rear detail eliminates the drive wheel force that the front fork could not hide.

Spring-loaded, characterized by special rigidity. do not provide dampers.

With spring and elastomer. they consist of a metal spring and a rubber damper in the center of the fork. The forks are used in bicycles for traversing moderate to fine terrain. Significant disadvantages include the low resistance of the pin to cold temperatures.

Air. air is pumped into the plug, it just dampens the vibrations. However, over time, air penetrates through the smallest holes, how long such a shock absorber will last depends on the sealing characteristics of the cuffs.

Oil-filled. instead of a damper, the front and rear forks include an oil cartridge.