Bicycle Knocks When You Pedal

The bike squeaks when you pedal

bicycle, pedal

A bicycle, like any other vehicle, cannot but make no sounds at all. It creaks a little, taps somewhere, tinkles pleasantly, etc. But there are sounds that indicate problems with a faithful two-wheeled friend. We are talking about a sharp unpleasant squeak, grinding and strange loud crunching sound in the pedals or saddle, as well as a strong knocking when moving.

To ensure that the problem does exist, the motorized vehicle must be tested. The best way to do this, of course, is at the stand, but it is quite enough and just to ride along a quiet street at different speeds, listening to the bike. Experts advise to get out of the saddle during the walking test, transferring maximum loads to the steering wheel and pedals. so the results of the examination will be more reliable.

Causes of “extraneous” bicycle sounds

The most common cause of a strong bicycle squeak (namely, it is the most common “painful” sound emitted by this vehicle) is the increased friction of one part against another against usual. And the source of such a sound is not difficult to find. It is necessary to carefully listen to the bike in motion, catching by ear. where the creak comes from (crunch, knock, etc.). However, you need to keep in mind that a bicycle frame is an excellent sound conductor and can distort information about some sound sources.

The most common object that produces an annoying, annoying squeak (after the saddle and seatpost) is by far the pedals. And this is not surprising. After all, these elements of the cycling system are experiencing an enormous load. In addition, even if the pedals are not noticeably loose, they may have gaps in the joints. And these gaps get water, dirt and dust, doing their “dirty work”. Hence the sharp pedal creak, grinding.

Anti-creaky bike pedals

Of course, the problem of pedal creak and crunch should not be ignored. over, the solution of this issue does not require a lot of time and some special knowledge and skills. If extraneous sounds are detected, the pedals must be brung out or even replaced in cases where the problem cannot be solved otherwise.

After the bike has been “listened”, it is also necessary to take a good look at it. Chips, cracks and other mechanical damage can be found on the pedal platforms. Then it is better to replace the pedals. We can say that they are out of order and can no longer be repaired.

If there are no apparent reasons for squeaking, grinding, knocking and crunching, you should look for hidden reasons. And for this, the pedals should be carefully disassembled. The list of “suspects” in extraneous sounds should include:

  • too tight a thread on the connecting rods;
  • loose bolts (especially aluminum) fastening sprockets (they are often the cause of knocking);
  • dangling platform;
  • “Flying” bearing race.

The structure of bicycle pedals, their types

Whatever the bike model, its pedals (with rare exceptions) consist of several essential elements:

  • pedal axis. a metal threaded pin, thanks to which the pedal is screwed into the connecting rod;
  • platforms. a surface that is in direct contact with the foot;
  • bearings that provide the actual torque along the pedal axis;
  • and fasteners. bolts, nuts and all kinds of plugs.

Excessive use or difficult driving conditions can easily damage the pedals. However, some of their types are able to withstand heavy loads for a very long time. The main thing here is to choose the right one. To twist it easily (the leg did not slip, efforts had to be made to a minimum, etc.), there was resistance to wear, and the price was not too high and could be disassembled so that you could independently in case of problems.

And there is plenty to choose from. Bicycle pedals are:

  • Walking. These are the simplest ones, usually with a plastic platform. For inexpensive bike models. They break often because they are cheap.
  • MTB. Also for non-aggressive recreational skiing. With a wider platform than walking pedals and small studs on the surface for better traction. Manufactured from aluminum alloys.
  • Semi-contact. Almost like MTB pedals, but one side is equipped with a special mechanism. In order to twist them, special shoes are already required.
  • Contact. The most popular bike pedals in the cycling community. They are fastened with special spikes and do not have a platform. They are also made from aluminum alloys. Require special footwear.

Pedals and bottom bracket

Sit on the bike, apply the brakes and alternately press the right and left pedals, and then crank them. If a squeak appears on only one side when you turn, then the problem is most likely in the pedal bearing.

First, determine if the pedals are visibly damaged. If not, then the creak comes from the mechanism.

To eliminate cracking in the pedal, remove and disassemble it. When removing the pedals, remember that the thread types on the right and left pedals are different! The right pedal is unscrewed counterclockwise, and the left pedal is thus twisted. Carefully remove the balls, if you have loose bearing pedals, clean them, as well as the raceway and all nuts from dirt and old grease. Inspect all machine components for damage and rust.

If you find a problem, replace the part. It is recommended to replace the balls in any case, even if no chips or cracks are visible. If none were found, then lubricate the raceway with new grease, place the balls on it and assemble the pedal. It is necessary to tighten the nuts so that the pedal does not play (even better there will be a small and barely noticeable play), but it was not overtightened either. If the pedal still cracks, try to find the problem in the carriage.

The carriage is a very often wearing part, as it bears huge loads when pedaling. If, when pressing on the pedals, it squeaks on both sides, then it is necessary to disassemble the carriage to identify the problem. To do this, remove the connecting rods and the carriage, cover the connecting rod axles, the threads of the carriage assembly and cups with grease. Then build the system. If you have a non-separable cartridge carriage installed, then it will have to be replaced.

Chain and rear derailleur

The chain must be lubricated every 100-200 kilometers. Excess oil on the outside of the links must be removed, otherwise dirt will quickly adhere to the chain. What if the unpleasant sound remains after smearing? Before lubrication, it is advisable to wash the chain not with water, but with organic solvents: gasoline, alcohol and others. They effectively remove dirt and degrease. Water does not penetrate hard-to-reach parts of the chain and can cause rust formation.

A crackling sound in the cassette area may be caused by an unset switch. The sound comes from the chain bouncing from one star to another. Adjust the selector to match each gear exactly to the desired cassette star.

Steering column

The wheel bearing on loose bearings requires regular maintenance. To do this, unscrew the bolts holding the stem and anchor, then carefully remove the stem and fork. Remove balls from separator, clean and lubricate. Assemble the helmsman and tighten the armature carefully as it may break if pulled too tight.

Shock absorbers

If you suddenly hear a creak in the front or rear shock absorber, then the first thing you should do is disassemble the shock absorber itself and the hinges, clean them, dry them and lubricate everything thoroughly. Squeaking noise can be caused by old, dried grease, which impairs the ride comfort of the suspension. It is especially important to regularly sort out the shock absorber in order to notice the corrosion and destruction of the bearings in time, otherwise the suspension will start to jam, and then the axles may collapse, which leads to the need for overhaul or replacement of units.

The front shock absorber (fork) can knock when driving over difficult terrain if the damper is not working well enough or not functioning at all. Accordingly, in a spring-elastomer fork, the main cause of squeaks and crackles is elastomer wear. The knock in the oil fork may be due to a lack of oil in the cartridge. If you don’t notice a problem in the damper, simply re-run the fork and lubricate all parts where necessary. The steel spring can also creak. Lubricate it liberally with grease for troubleshooting.

Brakes

Squeaking brakes are an indicator of improper operation of the pads. This situation can arise for various reasons: dirt or grease has got on the pad and / or rotor (rim), incorrect position of the pads in relation to the brake disc (rim) or their wear, etc.

Clean with sandpaper and degrease the rotor and pads with alcohol or gasoline and do not touch them with your fingers, as human skin produces fat, which, in fact, we are fighting with. The brake pads have a porous structure, so they easily absorb grease. Oiled pads are best replaced. After cleaning the rotor, spin the wheel and sharply press the brake lever so that the shoe rub against the brake disc. Repeat the procedure as needed.

If the reason for the squeak is worn pads, then simply replace them.

For mechanical brakes, the squeak may be caused by the cable jacket if dirt or grease has dried on it. To fix the problem, flush the jacket with WD-40 or another solvent and fill it with some silicone grease.

Wheels

Due to the heavy load, the spokes weaken and begin to creak. All spokes must be tightened in a balanced manner.

Shuffling sounds often occur in the hub. Such a problem may arise if your cones are not tightened correctly, the bushing has unwound and has lost some of the balls, or if there is mechanical damage to the component parts of the part.

Saddle and seat post

If the sound appears when you pedal while seated and disappears when riding while standing, then it becomes clear that the creak is coming from the seat. First, determine whether the saddle squeaks or the seat post.

To fix the problem, disconnect the seatpost from the frame and then remove the bolts that hold the seat in place. Clean any dust, sand, and dirt from the post, clip and seat. Then screw on the saddle and insert the seat post into the frame. A very well cleaned seat clamp should be tight. Otherwise, the pin may move relative to the frame, creating unpleasant sounds.

The seat may squeak due to deformation of the frame or frames that attach the saddle to the post. In this case, its replacement is required.

In most cases, a simple bulkhead of all parts of the mechanism and their lubrication helps in the fight against various rattles of a bicycle. If you are not quite sure that you will assemble the mechanism back, it is better to immediately contact a specialist so as not to create additional problems for yourself.!

Extraneous sounds in your bike and their elimination!

Ideally, only a light, almost inaudible rustle of the chain, the noise of tires, and at idle the sound of a freehab (ratchet) should be heard from a rolling bike. The rest of the sounds that occur NOT during gear changes are extraneous.

Clicks, crackles In fact, clicks are a chronic problem for those who ride a lot on muddy roads. Clicks can be heard from a wide variety of places, they can sound in different tones, but in 99% of cases they have one reason. the ingress of grains of sand into the clamping joints. However, it is worth remembering that in the remaining 1%, clicks can be heard as a result of cracks in the metal. Sticky greases are used as a lubricant for such joints (pedros syn grease. very good).

The steering wheel creaks in the stem clamp. Sand got under the stem clamp. You need to remove the steering wheel, clean the seats, lubricate and reassemble.

The stem squeaks on the fork head tube. Quite a rare case, the elimination method is the same as above.

Saddle. Very rarely clicks the saddle frame in the seatpost clamp. can be cleaned without lubrication.

Seatpost. One of the most frequently clicked nodes. This is due to sand getting between the seatpost and the seat tube of the frame. You can check. with an effort shaking the saddle back and forth. It is treated by cleaning (do not forget to wipe, the frame tube is inside) and grease. Seatpost clamp. In fact, you cannot determine what exactly clicks. a pin or a clip, so you need to wipe and lubricate the entire assembly.

READ  Front sprocket does not shift on a bicycle

Carriage. The carriage begins to click only in one case. when the lubricant has disappeared inside and the balls began to turn into cubes. Check. dry metal rustling is heard during idle rotation of the carriage. It is treated by replacing the carriage.

Connecting rods. A problem no less rare than a seatpost. Diagnostics: on the move, put the cranks horizontally, stand on them, sit on the saddle, rotate the cranks 180 ° and stand up again (you can sit down slightly to load the cranks more). if you hear a click (s) while getting up or standing, remove the cranks, clean the seats, lubricate and put back. If there is no way to remove and clean the connecting rods, sometimes a slight tightening of the bolts that secure the connecting rods helps.

Bonds or rivets on the system. The sound is intermittent, occurs when the load on the pedal increases. If you have removable stars on the system, then you need to remove them, clean the links and seats, lubricate and screw back. If the stars sit on rivets, it is radically treated only by replacing the entire system, and partially by pouring the rivets themselves with liquid lubricant / washing, such as WD-40.

Chain. Periodic rare sound. Rarely, but the chain clicks when it is ready to break, that is, one cheek has already climbed off the pin. that’s where it clicks. It is treated by throwing out the damaged link and assembling the chain.

Pedals. The pedals, like the carriage, begin to click only in one case. when the lubricant has disappeared inside and the balls began to turn into cubes. Checking. dry metal rustling is heard during idle pedal rotation. It is treated by a bulkhead, sometimes by replacement.

Crown or gorilla at the fork. Usually crackles when braking. If a crown or a gorilla on bolts is disassembled, cleaned and reassembled, if you continue to click, drag it to the workshop, most likely you have hit a fork somewhere and something will have to be changed. If the crown or gorilla is without bolts, the fork has definitely hit and bent slightly, acc. drag to the workshop.

Suspension elements for double-hangers. Can click amorter fasteners, respectively remove, clean, lubricate and assemble back.

Squeak, whistling Squeak can be either a series of clicks (then see above) or an independent sound (such as foam on glass). The reason in 99% of cases is the lack of lubrication in the rubbing unit. The remaining 1% is a fracture of metal or plastic.

Chain. The whistle is high pitched and constant, occurring as you pedal. The most common source of whistling and squeaking, can be treated by cleaning and lubricating (chain lubricant, essno).

Rear derailer rollers. Periodic high-pitched whistles while pedaling. They often creak too. To be treated by bulkhead, and lubricated with graphite grease.

Anthers on bushings. Rarely, but it happens. Periodic whistling, no pedaling. It is treated by lubrication with a liquid lubricant with a graphite component.

Saddle. A squeak usually appears when the saddle frame ceases to sit tightly in the saddle frame (it’s easy to check. slightly shake the saddle in all directions, a slight play should be felt) sometimes lubrication helps, sometimes filling with a sealant or thread lock helps, but radically. only replacing the saddle.

A more rare case. part of the seat rubs against the frame, this happens on well-worn saddles with “tired” plastic, it is treated by replacing the saddle.

Rim brakes. A creak occurs when braking. It is treated by resetting the pads.

Disc brakes. The problem with the squeak is the filthy quality of the pads, but manufacturers insist that this can be cured by rubbing the disc with alcohol. However, this method works.

Suspension elements for double-hangers. Depending on the type of suspension hinges, it is treated with a bulkhead and grease or only grease.

Grinding sound To clarify the character, let’s take an example. the sounds that occur when changing gears in front.

Front derailer. In fact, if all the components of the drive are selected and configured correctly, and there is a not too much used chain, there should be no rattling in any gears. Even at 3-1 or 1-9 (gears with extreme chain skew). However, in the same case, but with a well-tied chain, in skewed gears, it will rub against the derailer frame. Accordingly, the treatment here is chain replacement. It may also be to blame for the backlash in the carriage (replacement), or bent stars of the system (replacement, or try to tap it off). If the components were selected NOT in accordance with the recommendations of the manufacturers, there may be an unlimited number of reasons, but in any case, everything will come down to limiting the use of skewed gears and adjusting the front derailer.

The carriage is also capable of emitting a grinding sound, but in this case it will be in an almost jammed state, because the balls have long turned into cubes, pyramids and other geometric figures. It is treated by replacement.

Hiss. an intermittent, quiet hissing sound

The brakes are rim. You have a figure eight on the rim, or a broken sidewall on the rim. In an amicable way, you need to straighten it, but if this is not possible, then just dilute a little block. It can also touch the tire on the block, in case of incorrect settings or a strong “egg”.

Disc brakes. Your disc is bent. You need to straighten it (tap or bend it in the opposite direction).

The tire is brushing against the frame or leg of the fork. It happens in the case of a serious eight. you must definitely fix it, because the tire is able to saw through the frame.

Blows

In a standard situation, only the rear derailer can knock on the frame, as well as the chain on the frame.

Rear derailer. Pull it to the frame with your hand and see where it hits. Glue a piece of rubber in this place.

Chain. It chronically bangs against the chainstay. Either from above or from below. It is treated by wrapping the feather with a soft thread such as a Lizard skins or the like. You can just tape.

The tire is brushing against the frame or leg of the fork. It happens in the case of a serious eight. you must definitely fix it, because the tire is able to saw through the frame.

Any equipment can start creaking, and a bicycle is no exception. He is constantly under enormous stress. It is not uncommon for most cyclists to hear clicks or squeaks coming from a node. In fact, the hardest part is finding the source of the unpleasant sound. In fact, squeaking causes two or more elements to rub against each other. In this case, they just need to be lubricated or even reassembled. The problem is that due to the bike frame, the sound may not come from the place of its origin.

That is why it is very common for cyclists to check the rear hub when there is a sound from the handlebars. Of course, there are no clear instructions for each creak. In addition, we will not delve into the complex structure of a double-suspension suspension. Let’s take a look at what can creak.

The brakes creak First, let’s talk about the brakes. This is what most cyclists face. It even comes to the point that cyclists begin to consider this a normal phenomenon. Consider V-brakes. In these places, a squeak can appear for three reasons. The first reason is the material used for the brake pad, the second is the condition of the rim, and the third is the supply of these very pads. The first reason is easy to eliminate. It is only necessary to carry out experiments with pads. If the rubber is soft, the brakes are quieter, but they quickly become unusable.

Next is the condition of the rim. Here you need to see how dirty and worn it is. There are times when the condition is so deplorable that it simply bursts along its circumference. Therefore, it is better to check it and do not bring it to such a state. To clean the rim, you need to use gasoline, thinner or white spirit. The most important thing is the purification of bitumen from each block. If chemistry does not help, then you can use medium grain sandpaper. Remember that each block must be accurately positioned at a specific angle.

If disc brakes are installed, they are much easier to handle. It is worth paying attention to what the pads themselves are made of. When they are made of metal, they heat up more slowly, which is why they are used where cyclists resort to powerful braking. This happens most often in the mountains. Such a system can beep if it is raining outside. Organic pads have good modulation, as well as quiet operation. Everything would be perfect if they did not wear out very quickly with constant skating. over, they heat up quite quickly. It is best to replace them in a timely manner. Considering the upcoming loads, it is advisable to stock up on a set of additional pads. As for the rotors, they can be cleaned by analogy: sandpaper and solvents.

Squeak emanating from the carriage However, it is the carriage that squeaks most often. This is due to the constant load on this bike assembly. Therefore, you should first make sure that the squeak is not coming from the pedals. To do this, you need to remove the pedals, check for backlash, then lubricate the threads, and then put them back. It is advisable to carry out the last point twice a year. If you suddenly have other pedals in stock, then it is worth installing them for testing. In the event of a continuing squeak, unscrew the carriage, because it is clear that it is not his fault that the pedals are to blame.

Be sure to wipe very well and inspect the carriage in detail, lubricate, and then reassemble. There is no need to delay, making all imaginable and inconceivable efforts. Ideal with a torque wrench at hand. After that, the sound should disappear. In the case of a cartridge carriage, going through the assembly will be useless. Only a complete replacement will help here. Alternatively, you can check if the stars are well bolted to the system. To do this, first you need to unscrew each bolt, lubricate the threads and screw into place.

Squeak from the steering column The steering column can be called the most problematic, as it transmits sounds all over the frame at once. For this reason, finding the true source is not easy. The best solution is to unscrew the steering head, clean it, and then grease each bearing. All bolts must be tightened very carefully, taking into account the free play.

Sound from seat and pin This squeak is also not good. We remove the bolt that secures the saddle from below. After that, we lubricate it with a thread lock and screw it into place. Again, you cannot overtighten: the bolt may simply burst. If this procedure does not help, then it’s all about the pin under the saddle. It needs to be pulled out and the seat tube cleaned, which often contains a lot of sand. Next, clean and seat. Then apply heavy grease. Don’t forget the seat clamp. It also needs to be kept clean and tightened tightly.

Roller whistling Sound may come from the rear derailleur rollers. There are no bearings, but grease should be used for the cups. The problem is that even after one month, they can start whistling again. This can be fixed by replacing them with special rollers with industrial bearings.

Wheel crackle In some cases, you can hear the sound coming from the bottom of the bike. Most likely it’s all about the wheels, namely the spokes. There is a possibility of unsettled knitting needles, and therefore it is worthwhile to take actions to shrink them. If this does not help, then you will have to remove each spoke separately, and then lubricate the threads.

In fact, anything can squeak and make noise in a bicycle. For this reason, do not limit yourself to just the tips described. Check wheel hubs, chain, fork and other parts. In any case, you have to look. Sometimes you have to check each bolt along with the rotor. But you must admit: riding a bike that squeaks is at least unpleasant, even more so. unsafe. Sometimes this speaks of a gradually breaking frame. In this case, you need to try to push your foot on the carriage axle, while pressing with all your weight on the saddle. If the rear triangle does not play, then everything is fine.

An extreme case is the separation of the head tube. But that rarely happens. Check the bike, monitor the condition of the components and there will be much less cause for concern, and the service life will be many times longer.

How to remove squeaky pedals on a bike. Why does the bike squeak when riding (pedals, rear shock, etc.)

Sooner or later, all parts and mechanisms of the bicycle wear out. If suddenly you have an extraneous sound while riding, it means that any part of the bike began to work incorrectly. For a comfortable and safe ride, you must definitely correct the situation! But how to understand exactly where and why the bike squeaks?

READ  Which Lubricant Is Better For A Bicycle Chain

Pedals and bottom bracket

Sit on the bike, apply the brakes and alternately press the right and left pedals, and then crank them. If a squeak appears on only one side when you turn, then the problem is most likely in the pedal bearing.

First, determine if the pedals are visibly damaged. If not, then the creak comes from the mechanism.

To eliminate cracking in the pedal, remove and disassemble it. When removing the pedals, remember that the thread types on the right and left pedals are different! The right pedal is unscrewed counterclockwise, and the left pedal is thus twisted. Carefully remove the balls, if you have loose bearing pedals, clean them, as well as the raceway and all nuts from dirt and old grease. Inspect all machine components for damage and rust.

If you find a problem, replace the part. It is recommended to replace the balls in any case, even if no chips or cracks are visible. If none were found, then lubricate the raceway with new grease, place the balls on it and assemble the pedal. It is necessary to tighten the nuts so that the pedal does not play (even better there will be a small and barely noticeable play), but it was not overtightened either. If the pedal still cracks, try to find the problem in the carriage.

The carriage is a very often wearing part, as it bears huge loads when pedaling. If, when pressing on the pedals, it squeaks on both sides, then it is necessary to disassemble the carriage to identify the problem. To do this, remove the connecting rods and the carriage, cover the connecting rod axles, the threads of the carriage assembly and cups with grease. Then build the system. If you have a non-separable cartridge carriage installed, then it will have to be replaced.

Chain and rear derailleur

The chain must be lubricated every 100-200 kilometers. Excess oil on the outside of the links must be removed, otherwise dirt will quickly adhere to the chain. What if the unpleasant sound remains after smearing? Before lubrication, it is advisable to wash the chain not with water, but with organic solvents: gasoline, alcohol and others. They effectively remove dirt and degrease. Water does not penetrate hard-to-reach parts of the chain and can cause rust formation.

A crackling sound in the cassette area may be caused by an unset switch. The sound comes from the chain bouncing from one star to another. Adjust the selector to match each gear exactly to the desired cassette star.

Steering column

The wheel bearing on loose bearings requires regular maintenance. To do this, unscrew the bolts holding the stem and anchor, then carefully remove the stem and fork. Remove balls from separator, clean and lubricate. Assemble the helmsman and tighten the armature carefully as it may break if pulled too tight.

Unscrew the anchor cap first and then the stem bolts

Shock absorbers

If you suddenly hear a creak in the front or rear shock absorber, then the first thing you should do is disassemble the shock absorber itself and the hinges, clean them, dry them and lubricate everything thoroughly. Squeaking noise can be caused by old, dried grease, which impairs the ride comfort of the suspension. It is especially important to regularly sort out the shock absorber in order to notice the corrosion and destruction of the bearings in time, otherwise the suspension will start to jam, and then the axles may collapse, which leads to the need for overhaul or replacement of units.

The front shock absorber (fork) can knock when driving over difficult terrain if the damper is not working well enough or not functioning at all. Accordingly, in a spring-elastomer fork, the main cause of squeaks and crackles is elastomer wear. The knock in the oil fork may be due to a lack of oil in the cartridge. If you don’t notice a problem in the damper, simply re-run the fork and lubricate all parts where necessary. The steel spring can also creak. Lubricate it liberally with grease for troubleshooting.

Brakes

Squeaking brakes are an indicator of improper operation of the pads. This situation can arise for various reasons: dirt or grease has got on the pad and / or rotor (rim), incorrect position of the pads in relation to the brake disc (rim) or their wear, etc.

Clean with sandpaper and degrease the rotor and pads with alcohol or gasoline and do not touch them with your fingers, as human skin produces fat, which, in fact, we are fighting with. The brake pads have a porous structure, so they easily absorb grease. Oiled pads are best replaced. After cleaning the rotor, spin the wheel and sharply press the brake lever so that the shoe rub against the brake disc. Repeat the procedure as needed.

If the reason for the squeak is worn pads, then simply replace them.

For mechanical brakes, the squeak may be caused by the cable jacket if dirt or grease has dried on it. To fix the problem, flush the jacket with WD-40 or another solvent and fill it with some silicone grease.

Wheels

Due to the heavy load, the spokes weaken and begin to creak. All spokes must be tightened in a balanced manner.

Shuffling sounds often occur in the hub. Such a problem can arise if your cones are incorrectly tightened, the bushing has unwound and some of the balls have lost, or if there is mechanical damage to the component parts of the part. What to do: Take apart the bushing and count the number of balls on both sides. If the number of balls is different, all of them must be replaced so that the size and degree of wear are the same for all balls. Inspect the balls and their seating for chips or cracks. Then lubricate the bearing and tighten the cones correctly: for this, leave a barely noticeable play. If you overtighten or, conversely, tighten poorly, then the life of the sleeve will rapidly decrease.

One possible cause of bushing grinding is a damaged bearing raceway.

Saddle and seat post

If the sound appears when you pedal while seated and disappears when riding while standing, then it becomes clear that the creak is coming from the seat. First, determine whether the saddle squeaks or the seat post.

To fix the problem, disconnect the seatpost from the frame and then remove the bolts that hold the seat in place. Clean any dust, sand, and dirt from the post, clip and seat. Then screw on the saddle and insert the seat post into the frame. A very well cleaned seat clamp should be tight. Otherwise, the pin may move relative to the frame, creating unpleasant sounds.

The seatpost and clamp will rust over time and need to be looked after

The seat may squeak due to deformation of the frame or frames that attach the saddle to the post. In this case, its replacement is required.

In most cases, a simple bulkhead of all parts of the mechanism and their lubrication helps in the fight against various rattles of a bicycle. If you are not quite sure that you will assemble the mechanism back, it is better to immediately contact a specialist so as not to create additional problems for yourself.!

Tech Tuesday: How to Remove and Install Pedals

Read on. Replacing the pedals should be a relatively straightforward task compared to other mechanical jobs you might have to do on your bike. after all, it only needs one tool and only a few steps. So why do so many riders run into trouble when trying to remove the pedals? It seems like it should be fast, but a simple job can sometimes turn into a nightmare of bloody joints and confusion. Below you will learn how not to go down this path when the time comes to do the job.

Watch the video to see how easy it is to remove and install the pedals!

Step-by-step instructions for removing and installing the pedal Required tools: Pedal wrench (15mm open end wrench or 6/8mm hex wrench also fits some pedals) and lubricant

All you ‘You need a pedal wrench and some grease.

It will be much easier for you to do this job if you hold the bike with its wheels right side up in the following steps: When I speak of loosening or tightening the pedals, I will use the terms clockwise and counterclockwise, as if you were looking at that side you are working on.

Before starting this work, you need to familiarize yourself with how to release the pedals. Sounds simple enough, right? The curved ball is that the left pedal ( non-drive side ) has a left-hand thread, which means you turn it clockwise to disengage it from the connecting rod. Right pedal ( leading side ) has a standard right-hand thread, turn it to the left to loosen it Again: turn the non-drive pedal clockwise to loosen it, turn the drive side pedal counterclockwise to loosen it.

Some pedals have four wrench flats, making it easy to place the pedal wrench in the desired location. Some also have 6 or 8 mm hex access on the back of the spindle. These pedals have only two wrench flats.

Unlike many other repairs, I find this much easier to do when the bike is on the ground. The reason for this is that sometimes it takes a strong push to release the pedals, and sometimes the stand has enough deflection to make it difficult. Also, placing the bike on the floor will give you more flexibility as you can use your body weight. to help yourself.

By aligning the handle and pedal wrench in this position, you can use your body weight to release the pedal.

Let’s start with the pedal on the drive side. Align the drive end crank so that it is at or close to the 3 o’clock position. Some pedals have four wrench flats (, located on the spindle, just outside the crank ), which will make it easier to fit the pedal wrench so that it is easier to loosen it, you can only have two opposite wrench flats. Ideally, the wrench should be close to the parallel, if slightly higher, connecting rod. As you turn the wrench counterclockwise to loosen the pedal, this will allow you to push from above and use your body weight to pry out the pedal. Do not knock your knuckles against the chain rings or chain guide when the pedal is loose. When it is free, you can unscrew it completely, being careful not to lose the pedal washer, if any.

Set the drive pedal to the 3 o’clock position

3.Now remove the non-drive side pedal. Rotate the crank so that it is at or close to the 9 o’clock position. Again, this will allow you to apply more force after you place the pedal switch in the same way as you did when you removed the drive end pedal. Turn the wrench down and clockwise using your body weight. When it rotates freely, it is completely unscrewed, while do not forget that the pedal washer, if any.

Turn the non-drive side pedal to the 9 o’clock position

4.Before reinstalling the pedals, take a minute to clear any dirt from the crank and pedal threads. Before starting installation, apply a small amount of grease to the pedal threads as this will make it easier to remove them again in the future and will minimize the chances of squeaking. # 5. Always start hand-tightening the pedals to reduce the chance of thread damage. Turn the drive pedal clockwise to tighten. To tighten, turn the non-drive side pedal counterclockwise. Finish tightening the pedals with the pedal wrench. Always be sure to double check that you tightened them, as losing pedaling on the trail can lead to disaster! Did you find this issue of Tech Tuesday helpful? If you have any tips that you would like to share, please add them below.!

Tech Tuesday # 1. How to install a new tube. Tech Tuesday # 2. How to adjust the SRAM rear derailleur

How to fix squeaky bike pedals

Squeaking bicycle pedals are not only a serious irritant during your workout, but they can also indicate a mechanical problem that could cost you money or cause injury if not addressed in time. Depending on the actual source of the noise, ignoring the squeaky pedal can result in costly damage to your bike. or serious injury if any part breaks while driving. Finding the source of the squeak can be tricky, but there are several ways to identify and fix the problem.

How to fix squeaky bike pedals

Wash your bike with mild soap and water, being careful not to spray high pressure jets of water on the bearings. Dirt buildup can cause pedals to squeak, so check this before trying anything else. Always dry your bike thoroughly.

Inspect the pedal housing to make sure there are no loose screws. If you have traditional platform pedals, the pedal guard is probably attached to the pedal body with four Phillips head screws. If you are using footrests on the pedals, check the mounting screws. If you are using pedals without clamps, check the tightness of the screws on the retaining plates and the hex bolts that attach the cleats to your shoe; loose screws in any of these areas can cause squeaking. Worn cleats allowing too much movement can also cause a problem.

READ  Bicycle Motor Mount Kit

Note that the problem may not be with the pedals at all, but rather with a related or related component. Bad connecting rod. common reason. Check the large hex bolt for tightness holding each arm in place and check the hex bolts that attach the chain rings to the connecting rod. Take a close look at the front derailleur to make sure it is not rubbing against the chain. Make sure the chain is properly lubricated as lack of lubrication is another common source of transmission noise.

Handpieces

Bicycles / maintenance and repair / pedals / pedal removal. Wikibooks, open books for the open world

From Wikibooks, Open World Books

Other reasons why this message may appear:

How to install and remove pedals. 10 easy steps to pedal happiness

The pedals are screwed into the cranks using a thread that is the latest universal standard for bicycles. Installing and removing them is as easy as twisting two pieces together, but there are some tricks that will make the job easier and faster. That’s how.

The most important thing you need to know about pedals is that the threads on the left and right sides are different. The pedal on the drive side has a right-hand thread. normal, which needs to be turned clockwise to tighten. But the left side has a left-hand thread, so tightens counterclockwise. Your fingers are probably so used to the right threads that you will often make mistakes, but after a while it will become a habit.

The left pedal has a left-hand thread, because otherwise it would unscrew while driving.

Tools and materials

Pedal wrench with 15 mm end 6 or 8 mm hexagon wrench Grease

Determining the type of pedal axis

Pedals are usually labeled L or R to indicate the threads and therefore the side of the bike they fit on (as viewed from the rider’s perspective). Top image is a pair of Shimano 105 SPD-SL pedals with axle markings: L for left and R for right.

The bottom image shows a pair of Shimano XTR SPD pedals that do not have wrenches or L and R markings. Typically, for this type of pedal, the marks and. the spring tension on the adjusting plates should be on the back of the pedal.

Lubricate the threads. This is vital; do not neglect it, no matter how rushed you are. We did this, then rode the bike thousands of wet and sandy miles only to find that the threaded connection between the axle and the connecting rod was completely corroded. All that is required. This is a thin layer of grease, and you will avoid the nightmare of the pedal threads not budging.

For tightening and removing the pedals, the axles have either wrench flats, hex wrench sockets, or both. For flat surfaces, almost all modern pedals require a 15 mm wrench, although many pedal wrenches also have 9 / 16 ” jaws for old pedals. Resist the temptation to use thin wheel cone wrenches as they warp and fail.

If there is a hex head, it will be 6mm or 8mm. Some pedals only have a hex. The hex key is convenient in that you can remove or tighten the pedals using the hex key on the multifunction tool; Carrying a suitable pedal wrench in your jersey is a little awkward.

Installing the pedals

As explained above, the left pedal has a left hand thread, so it tightens counterclockwise.

After lightly lubricating the threads, insert the left pedal into the threads of the left crank arm. Make sure they are perpendicular to each other and rotate the axle counterclockwise until the first threads engage freely and easily. Screw the pedal into the crank. You should be able to turn it with your fingers or lightly pressing a wrench or hex key. Do not force it. If you want to show off, hold on to the axle and rotate the crank clockwise to engage all threads.

If the threads are poorly defined, you may need an Allen key or pedal wrench for the last few turns. Press the pedal threads into the crank arm to secure them. Don’t go crazy pedaling. They do not require more tightening than a conventional multi-tool can provide. Pedal wrench length is intended for removing poorly installed, dry or rusted pedals, NOT for replacing properly lubricated pedals.

The right pedal (drive end) tightens when the axle is turned clockwise, so follow the same method but turn the axle clockwise (or crank counterclockwise).

Removing the Pedals

This is an element of pedal installation and removal where the extra force of a long hex wrench can be really helpful. The extra length and light weight and impact force can help free stuck pedals. Of course, it is better to pre-apply lubricant to the threads before installing them to avoid hassle.

Pedals generally need a little more leverage to pull them out of the crank arms than they do to install them. This is where a pedal wrench and / or an 8mm Allen wrench comes in handy.

For left pedals, move the crank toward the front of the bike (at 9 o’clock when viewed from the side), place the tool you are using on / in the axle (with the tool handle the handle going to the back of the bike) and push the handle down sharply. to loosen the thread.

For the right pedal, follow the same process as for the left pedal. Position the crank towards the front wheel, slightly below the horizontal to give the joints some room. When the instrument is attached to the pedal, its handle should point towards the rear wheel.

Why the bike squeaks when riding and how to fix it

Sooner or later, all parts and mechanisms of the bicycle wear out. If suddenly you have an extraneous sound while riding, it means that any part of the bike began to work incorrectly. For a comfortable and safe ride, you must definitely correct the situation! But how to understand exactly where and why the bike squeaks?

Pedals and bottom bracket

Sit on the bike, apply the brakes and alternately press the right and left pedals, and then crank them. If a squeak appears on only one side when you turn, then the problem is most likely in the pedal bearing.

First, determine if the pedals are visibly damaged. If not, then the creak comes from the mechanism.

To eliminate cracking in the pedal, remove and disassemble it. When removing the pedals, remember that the thread types on the right and left pedals are different! The right pedal is unscrewed counterclockwise, and the left pedal is thus twisted. Carefully remove the balls, if you have loose bearing pedals, clean them, as well as the raceway and all nuts from dirt and old grease. Inspect all machine components for damage and rust.

If you find a problem, replace the part. It is recommended to replace the balls in any case, even if no chips or cracks are visible. If none were found, then lubricate the raceway with new grease, place the balls on it and assemble the pedal. It is necessary to tighten the nuts so that the pedal does not play (even better there will be a small and barely noticeable play), but it was not overtightened either. If the pedal still cracks, try to find the problem in the carriage.

The carriage is a very often wearing part, as it bears huge loads when pedaling. If, when pressing on the pedals, it squeaks on both sides, then it is necessary to disassemble the carriage to identify the problem. To do this, remove the connecting rods and the carriage, cover the connecting rod axles, the threads of the carriage assembly and cups with grease. Then build the system. If you have a non-separable cartridge carriage installed, then it will have to be replaced.

Chain and rear derailleur

The chain must be lubricated every 100-200 kilometers. Excess oil on the outside of the links must be removed, otherwise dirt will quickly adhere to the chain. What if the unpleasant sound remains after smearing? Before lubrication, it is advisable to wash the chain not with water, but with organic solvents: gasoline, alcohol and others. They effectively remove dirt and degrease. Water does not penetrate hard-to-reach parts of the chain and can cause rust formation.

A crackling sound in the cassette area may be caused by an unset switch. The sound comes from the chain bouncing from one star to another. Adjust the selector to match each gear exactly to the desired cassette star.

Steering column

The wheel bearing on loose bearings requires regular maintenance. To do this, unscrew the bolts holding the stem and anchor, then carefully remove the stem and fork. Remove balls from separator, clean and lubricate. Assemble the helmsman and tighten the armature carefully as it may break if pulled too tight.

Shock absorbers

If you suddenly hear a creak in the front or rear shock absorber, then the first thing you should do is disassemble the shock absorber itself and the hinges, clean them, dry them and lubricate everything thoroughly. Squeaking noise can be caused by old, dried grease, which impairs the ride comfort of the suspension. It is especially important to regularly sort out the shock absorber in order to notice the corrosion and destruction of the bearings in time, otherwise the suspension will start to jam, and then the axles may collapse, which leads to the need for overhaul or replacement of units.

The front shock absorber (fork) can knock when driving over difficult terrain if the damper is not working well enough or not functioning at all. Accordingly, in a spring-elastomer fork, the main cause of squeaks and crackles is elastomer wear. The knock in the oil fork may be due to a lack of oil in the cartridge. If you don’t notice a problem in the damper, simply re-run the fork and lubricate all parts where necessary. The steel spring can also creak. Lubricate it liberally with grease for troubleshooting.

Brakes

Squeaking brakes are an indicator of improper operation of the pads. This situation can arise for various reasons: dirt or grease has got on the pad and / or rotor (rim), incorrect position of the pads in relation to the brake disc (rim) or their wear, etc.

Clean with sandpaper and degrease the rotor and pads with alcohol or gasoline and do not touch them with your fingers, as human skin produces fat, which, in fact, we are fighting with. The brake pads have a porous structure, so they easily absorb grease. Oiled pads are best replaced. After cleaning the rotor, spin the wheel and sharply press the brake lever so that the shoe rub against the brake disc. Repeat the procedure as needed.

If the reason for the squeak is worn pads, then simply replace them.

For mechanical brakes, the squeak may be caused by the cable jacket if dirt or grease has dried on it. To fix the problem, flush the jacket with WD-40 or another solvent and fill it with some silicone grease.

Wheels

Due to the heavy load, the spokes weaken and begin to creak. All spokes must be tightened in a balanced manner.

Shuffling sounds often occur in the hub. Such a problem can arise if your cones are incorrectly tightened, the bushing has unwound and some of the balls have lost, or if there is mechanical damage to the component parts of the part. What to do: Take apart the bushing and count the number of balls on both sides. If the number of balls is different, all of them must be replaced so that the size and degree of wear are the same for all balls. Inspect the balls and their seating for chips or cracks. Then lubricate the bearing and tighten the cones correctly: for this, leave a barely noticeable play. If you overtighten or, conversely, tighten poorly, then the life of the sleeve will rapidly decrease.

Saddle and seat post

If the sound appears when you pedal while seated and disappears when riding while standing, then it becomes clear that the creak is coming from the seat. First, determine whether the saddle squeaks or the seat post.

To fix the problem, disconnect the seatpost from the frame and then remove the bolts that hold the seat in place. Clean any dust, sand, and dirt from the post, clip and seat. Then screw on the saddle and insert the seat post into the frame. A very well cleaned seat clamp should be tight. Otherwise, the pin may move relative to the frame, creating unpleasant sounds.

The seat may squeak due to deformation of the frame or frames that attach the saddle to the post. In this case, its replacement is required.

In most cases, a simple bulkhead of all parts of the mechanism and their lubrication helps in the fight against various rattles of a bicycle. If you are not quite sure that you will assemble the mechanism back, it is better to immediately contact a specialist so as not to create additional problems for yourself.!