Bicycle Chain Off Speed

The chain flies on a high-speed bike what to do. What to do if the chain comes off on a speed bike

A bicycle is a unique means of transportation. It does not pollute the environment, has a positive effect on the health of its owner, and allows you to experience physical activity in the fresh air. A bicycle is the first vehicle that a person gets in his life and for many it remains a favorite means of transportation for life. The most common problem faced by every cycling enthusiast is the chain flying off the bike. For what reasons this happens and what needs to be done to fix this problem, we will try to figure it out in this article.

Speed ​​bike problem

For a regular bike, this problem is easy to solve, but what to do if the chain jumps off on a speed bike? Among the most common causes of this problem are the following:

  • deformation of one of the stars. Gear shifting on multi-speed bicycles is carried out using cassettes consisting of several stars. These designs are collapsible and non-collapsible. Replacement of a damaged star is possible only in collapsible structures, if the structure is non-collapsible, its complete replacement is required.
  • Mistakes in the setting of the derailleur can cause the chain to fly off the bike when shifting gears. Gear shifting should be fine-tuned. If the bike owner himself cannot do this, you need to contact a specialist, or carefully study the instructions for setting the bike speed switch. The safety of the cyclist depends on the quality of this function.
  • Stretching the bike chain. This process is associated with long-term use of the chain, the application of high dynamic loads to it, irregular cleaning, due to which the residues of lubricants, mixed with dirt and dust, accumulate on the chain links. In this case, the chain must be shortened or replaced. To shorten the chain, you need to remove several links from it. This is done using a special squeeze tool. This simple tool is a must-have for every cyclist. With its help, the axle of the link (pin) in the lockless type bicycle chain is pushed out. If there is noticeable stretch on the bike chain, and the service life is long, it will be more advisable to replace it completely. To keep the chain in good condition, it must be periodically rinsed in kerosene and cleaned.
  • The curvature of individual chain links as a result of which the chain flies off the bike.

Loose chain tension on bicycles without gears

To eliminate the problem that has arisen, you need to understand why it has arisen and tighten the chain. This is done using special wrenches that every cyclist should have with them.

It is much easier to tighten the chain on a regular bike, in the case of a speed bike it will be more difficult. For successful repair work, when the chain falls off the bike without speeds, you need:

  • turn the bike upside down.
  • If the rear wheel is attached with an eccentric, then you need to loosen it a little, or not completely unscrew the nuts.
  • Adjust the desired chain slack.
  • Tighten nuts.
  • Check chain tension and quality of work.

Link curvature Rear wheel distortion

Perhaps the problem is the deformation of the rear wheel. One of the most unpleasant cyclists’ problem is the so-called “eight”. “Eight” is the deformation of the wheel, violation of its shape and the inability to perform functions. This problem is eliminated by tightening and loosening the spokes with a special spoke wrench. To do this, the wheel is removed, the affected area is determined and the central spoke of the “figure of eight” is highlighted. Then the needles are pulled through one.

How to increase the tightness of the bike chain

The case with high-speed bicycles is much more complicated. How to chain a bike at speeds?

The transmission unit for bicycles with speeds, of which the bicycle chain is an element, consists of cassettes with several stars. Therefore, the repair work to eliminate chain slippage and sagging on such bicycles has its own nuances. To understand the causes of the problem, you must:

  • If the chain constantly flies on a high-speed bike, it is worth checking if the sprockets are not damaged. If one of the stars in the cassette unit is deformed, the chain can be thrown over another star to continue moving. But in this case, you need to understand that you cannot switch the speed. This method is suitable in order to get home for better repairs. To eliminate the damage, the deformed star will have to be replaced, and if the assembly is not collapsible and the entire cassette is malfunctioning, then it must be replaced.
  • the chain flies on a high-speed bike the reason is a failure to set the speeds. Check the quality of the setting. Very often, a failure in the speed setting will cause the chain to hit. The setting is made according to a special scheme.
  • After eliminating the root cause, the chain must be put back in place.

To properly fit the chain on a speed bike, you need to disconnect it using a squeeze. If you take a new chain, then you need to measure the required length, for which the chain is thrown over the large stars of the cassette blocks and connected, measuring the required distance. The excess piece of the chain is removed using a special squeeze tool. By turning the screw, the link axis is displaced and the unnecessary chain section is removed. Then the chain is passed between the speed switches and connected using the same tool.

If the chain flies on a children’s bike, then, depending on the design, the same actions are performed as with an adult bicycle.

A malfunction of the transmission unit on a high-speed bike can threaten the health and life of its owner, the cyclist can fly out of the saddle by inertia, so you need to remember to carry out preventive maintenance work on the chain, check the condition of the speed switch and the integrity of the main parts. It is especially important to carry out a technical inspection of your vehicle before starting the movement, in the event that you make long cycling and crossings. Timely diagnostics of your bike is a guarantee of safety.

How to shift gears on a bike

Gear Shifting 101: How and When to Use Gears

Along with the brakes, gear shifting is one of the basic mechanical functions of your bike. Learning how to shift gears may sound basic, but practice gear shifting and shifting effectively. this is something that even experienced riders can work on. Correct gearing will not only improve your speed, but also make the ride more comfortable and increase your endurance on long journeys.

What does all of this mean ?!

Terminology. one of the hardest things about learning how to switch Low / High, Large / Small, Light / Hard, Fast / Slow, Front / Rear, One by One, Twice, Three for. if your head is already spinning you can brush up on the following dictionary words:

Low gear = Easy = Good for climbing: “Low” gear on your bike. it is the smallest chain ring in the front and the largest gear on your cassette (reverse gears). This position will be the easiest to pedal, and you will be able to pedal uphill with minimal resistance. Getting into this position is called “downshifting”.

High gear = Stiff = Good for downhill: “High” gear on your bike. this is the largest chain ring at the front and the smallest gear on your cassette (reverse gears). This position will be the hardest to pedal and you will be able to accelerate when going downhill. To get into this position, it is called “upshifting”.

_- Speed ​​Bike: When you were a kid, you probably bragged to your friends about the number of “speeds” your bike has. Whether it’s 7, 18, 21-speed, etc., that’s what you had in mind. this is the number of gears on your bike. You can determine this number by multiplying the number of teeth in your cassette (rear gears) by the number of chain links (front gears) on your bike. For example, if your bike has two chain rings and 11 teeth in the cassette, then you have a 21-speed bike. However, in today’s bicycle industry, expensive adult bikes are rarely referred to this way because, in fact, bigger doesn’t always mean better. on this below!

One, Two, Three-Po: The number of chain links (front gears) on your bike determines whether your drivetrain (gear system) will be labeled “one after the other”, “two for”, or “Three Deck”. Current trend in the bicycle industry. strive to produce the same gear range with fewer chain rings. The result is a larger cassette (rear gears) that has more teeth and often more teeth on the largest gear train in the cassette. Why? Because, in general, fewer chainrings make the bike more efficient, lighter, and easier to operate and adjust. For this reason, you will often see single drivetrains on high-end mountain bikes and dual drivetrains on high-end road bikes.

How to switch: the basics

So now that you have a basic understanding of what these gears are called, how do you shift? Depending on the type of bike, your shifters may differ slightly; on road bikes (or any bike with a folding handlebar), your derailleurs. these are the same levers you use to engage the brakes. To operate the switches, push the lever to the side until you hear a click. For most flat handlebar mountain and hybrid bikes, you shift gears with paddles that you control with your thumb. Some bicycles are equipped with “grip switches” or a disc that is located inside where you place your hands. In these systems, you shift gears by rotating the disc forward and backward.

Your shifters are connected to a cable enclosed in a protective sheath. When you click on the gears, the cable tightens and looses, applying more or less force to the derailleur, which moves your chain up and down the cassette or chain rings. Below we explain what each lever does:

Left hand: Controls the forward gears / front derailleur. moving the chain up and down the chain rings. These levers cause large jumps, gears when changing terrain.

Right hand: Controls the reverse gears / rear derailleur. moving the chain up and down the cassette. These levers are designed for small adjustments, transmission and use on small terrain changes.

Large lever: The larger of the two gear levers moves the chain onto the large rings. So big = big. Switching to large rings with your RIGHT hand will make pedaling EASIER. Shifting into higher gears with the LEFT hand will make it HEAVY.

Small lever: The smaller of the two gear levers moves the chain to smaller rings. So small = small. Shifting down to smaller rings with the RIGHT hand will make the pedal press HARD. LEFT-handed downshifts will make pedaling EASIER.

No big / small leverage? You may have a SRAM road drivetrain that uses a “double-push” system. This means that there is a smaller lever hidden behind the large brake lever and you can only move it in one direction. A long press (with two clicks) will move the chain to a simpler gear at the rear (right) and a larger and harder gear at the front (left). A short press (with one click) will move the chain to a stiffer, smaller gear at the back (right) and a smaller, lighter gear at the front (left hand).

You may also have a handle shift. This means you have a dial that you turn back and forth to change gears. Turning the dial forward will shift the chain to a smaller and more rigid gear in the back (right hand) and a smaller and lighter gear in the front (left hand). Turning the disc back will move the chain to a larger and lighter gear in the back (right hand) and a larger and lighter gear. harder gear in front (left hand).

READ  How to Attach the Speed ​​Switch to a Bicycle

Cross chain

Cross chain. is a term referring to being in one of the following gear combinations:

LARGE / LARGE: Largest tooth in cassette (lightest gear) and largest star ring (hardest gear))

SMALL / SMALL: Smallest cog in cassette (hardest gear) and smallest chain link (lightest gear)

In these positions, the chain stretches at an angle, which over time can damage the transmission and can cause the chain to slip or cause the front derailleur to make noise and malfunction.

Using the trim function

Some road bikes will have a front derailleur with a “trim” function. The pad allows minor changes to the front derailleur to eliminate chain friction, but not cause a complete shift to a different chain ring. This feature will come in handy when approaching the “cross chain” positions mentioned above.

So, if you are in the largest chain ring and start shifting to the large barbs on the cassette with your right hand, you may start to hear a grinding noise that indicates your chain is rubbing against the front derailleur. You can flick the small lever with your left hand once. to move the front derailleur slightly to match this chain position. Likewise, if you are in the smallest link in the chain and start to shift to the smaller cogs on the cassette and begin to notice a grinding noise, you can move the derailleur slightly by clicking once on the larger lever with your left hand.

Effective and efficient gear shifting techniques

Okay, here’s the most important thing to remember when riding any bike: THERE IS NO PERFECT MECHANISM! SHIFT!

Very often we see people putting too much energy into their pedals when they climb a steep hill in a large chain ring, or swing their legs when they are spinning in a gear that is too easy for the descent they are riding. driving time. keep your cadence as constant as possible (the speed at which your pedals make a full revolution)! This requires one of two things: shifting gears or increasing power output. The problem with power output is that unless you’re Wonder Woman, you have a limited supply of power. We recommend changing gears frequently to improve efficiency while riding.

Liv’s Tip: Start shifting to lighter gears with your right hand early to maintain a steady rhythm. Remember, your right hand is for small terrain changes. If you find that your pedaling speed is slowing down dramatically, you may have to use the front derailleur (left hand) to make it easier to shift gears for the big climb ahead. But if you’re already uphill and putting out a ton of power to the pedals, you might notice that your front derailleur doesn’t want to work! You will move, hear a grinding noise, but nothing happens and you will most likely stop in the middle of a hill.

Instead of chafing these gears, you will need to apply a little more power to the pedal travel right before shifting, and then ease the pedal travel when shifting. Less chain pressure makes it easier for your derailleur to remove the chain from the larger ring to the smaller ring.!

How to prevent speed fluctuations on your motorcycle: tips, tricks, and more. Cycling Science. how bicycles work and the physics behind them

Chris Woodford. Last modified: August 18, 2019.

If you had to pick the best car of all time, what would you say? If we were talking about machines that helped spread knowledge and educate people, you would probably choose the print press. If we were talking about inventions that allow people to farm the land and feed their families, you could pay for a plow or a tractor. If you think transportation is really important, you can choose a car engine, a steam engine, or an airplane jet engine, but for its purity and simplicity, I think I would choose a bicycle. This is a perfect example of how pure, scientific ideas can be used in highly practical technology. Let’s take a look at the science of cycles. and just what makes them so great!

On

What’s so great about bicycles?

Diagram: Comparison of the efficiency of everyday machines (approximate, indicative values, expressed as a percentage). Except for the bicycle, new technologies (e.g. diesel engines) are generally more efficient than older technologies (e.g. steam engines).

What’s so great is that they get you quickly to places without consuming fossil fuels like gasoline, diesel and coal, or creating pollution. They do this because they convert the energy our body produces very efficiently.. in kinetic energy (energy of motion). In fact, as you can see from the diagram opposite, these are the most efficient vehicles ever developed by humans. By using the strength of your muscles in a surprisingly efficient way, a bike can convert about 90 percent of the energy you give to the pedals into kinetic energy that propels you forward. Compare that to a car engine, which only converts about a quarter of the energy from gasoline to usable power. and at the same time produces all kinds of pollution.

Think of it this way: if you are driving wherever you go, you are carrying a piece of metal that probably weighs 10 to 20 times more than you (a typical compact car weighs over 1000 kg or 2000 pounds). What a waste of energy! Ride your bike and the metal you need to move with you is more than 6-9 kg (14-20 lbs) for a light racing bike or 11-20 kg (25-45 lbs) for a mountain bike or hiker, which is or your own weight.

Higher efficiency means you can continue cycling on the same amount of fuel, which is another great advantage of bicycles, although difficult to quantify. According to the classic book Cycling Science by David Gordon Wilson et al. km / h (20 mph) could travel over 574 kilometers per liter (1350 miles per US gallon) if high energy liquid food existed. gasoline “. Whatever one may say, the bikes are simply amazing!

Where does your energy go?

We have described a bicycle as a machine, and scientifically, this is exactly what it is: a device that can increase force (making it easier to go uphill) or speed. It is also a machine in the sense that it converts energy from one form (everything, what you ate) to another (the kinetic energy of your body and bike as they ride). You’ve probably heard of a law of physics called conservation of energy, which says that you can’t create energy out of thin air or make it disappear without a trace: anything you can do. is to convert it from one to another. So where does the energy do you bike ride? In scientific terms, we say that it means “doing work.” but what does this mean in practice?

Riding a bike can sometimes feel like hard work, especially if you are riding uphill. In the science of cycling, “hard work” means that you sometimes have to use quite a lot of force to pedal at any distance. If you are going uphill, you need to work against gravity. If you walk fast, you are working against the force of air resistance (drag) pressing on your body. Sometimes there are irregularities; on the road you need to drive; it requires more strength and uses energy too (bumps reduce your kinetic energy, reducing your speed).

But whether you are going uphill or downhill, fast or slow, on a flat road or bumpy, there is other work that always you just need to make your wheels spin. When the wheel is on the ground, supporting the load of, for example, a cyclist, the tire wrapped around it is crushed in some places, bulging in others. As you go around, the different parts of the tire contract and bulge, and the rubber they are made of pulls and pushes in all directions. Repeatedly squeezing the tire in this way is a bit like kneading a loaf: it takes energy. and this energy is known as rolling resistance. The greater the load on the tire (the heavier or more you carry), the higher the rolling resistance.

For a racing bike that rides fast, about 80 percent of the cyclist’s work is spent overcoming air resistance, and the rest. to combat rolling resistance; much slower for the mountain biker on rough terrain, 80 percent of their energy is spent on rolling resistance and only 20 percent is lost on dragging.

Chart: Slow mountain bikes spend most of their energy due to rolling resistance; faster racing bikes spend more due to air resistance.

How much energy are we really talking about? In the Tour de France, according to the fascinating Analysis by Training Peaks, the best riders average about 300-400 watts of power, which is roughly 3-4 old-fashioned 100-watt bulbs, or about 15 percent of the power required to run an electric teapot. In comparison, you can generate about 10 watts with a handheld power generator, although you cannot use one for very long without getting tired, what does that tell us? It is much easier to generate large amounts of energy over a long period of time using large leg muscles than using arms and hands. This is why bicycles are so smart: they use the most powerful muscles in our body.

How the bike frame works

If an adult weighs 60–80 kg (130–180 lb), the bike frame must be stiff enough so that it is not going to snap into place or buckle up the moment the rider gets on board. Ordinary bicycles have frames made from strong, inexpensive tubular steel (literally, hollow steel tubes containing only air) or lighter alloys based on steel or aluminum. Racing bikes are more likely to be made from carbon fiber composites, which are more expensive. but stronger, lighter and more rust resistant.

You might think that the aluminum tube bike frame would be much weaker. than one made of steel, but only if the tubes are the same size. In practice, each bike must be strong enough to support the rider’s weight. and the stresses that can arise from different types of handling. Thus, larger diameter tubes and / or thicker walls will be used for an aluminum bike. than a steel tube bicycle.

The frame doesn’t just support you: its triangular shape (often two triangles join together to form a diamond) is carefully designed to distribute your weight. Although the saddle is positioned much closer to the back of the handlebar, you lean forward to hold onto the handlebar. Corner bars in the frame are designed to more or less divide your weight evenly between the front and rear wheels. If you think about it, it really matters. If all of your weight has moved over the back of the wheel and you tried to pedal uphill, you will fall backwards; similarly, if there was too much weight on the front wheel, your heels would fall off every time you climbed down the mountain!

The frames are not designed for 100% rigidity; this will make the ride much less comfortable. Almost all bike frames flex and flex a little, so they absorb some of the shock. ride, although other factors (such as saddle and tires) have a much larger impact on ride comfort. It is also worth remembering that the human body itself is a remarkably efficient suspension system; When mountain biking on rough terrain, you will very quickly learn how your arms can act as shock absorbers! Indeed, it can be very instructive to look at the body as an extension (or addition) to the base bike frame, balanced on it.

How bicycle wheels work

If you’ve read our article on How Wheels Work, you know what the wheel is and the axle it rotates. this is an example of what scientists call a simple machine: it will increase in force or speed depending on how you turn it. Bicycle wheels are usually more than 50 cm (20 inches) in diameter, which is taller than most car wheels. The taller the wheels, the more they multiply their speed as you turn them on the axles. This is why racing bikes have the tallest wheels (usually around 70cm or 27.5 inches in diameter).

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The wheels end up supporting all your weight, but in a very interesting way. If the wheels were solid, they would squeeze (squeeze) as you sat in the seat and push back to support you. However, the wheels on most motorcycles actually consist of a solid hub, a thin rim and about 24 high tension spokes. Bicycles have spoked wheels rather than all-metal wheels to make them strong and lightweight and also reduce drag. (some riders use flat “paddle” or oval spokes instead of traditional rounded spokes in an attempt to reduce drag even further).

It is not only the number of spokes that are important, but also the way they are connected between the rim and its hub. Like the strands of a spider web or the hanging ropes of a suspension bridge, a bicycle wheel is under tension. Spokes are tight. Since the spokes intersect with the rim on the opposite side of the hub, the wheel is not as flat and flimsy as it sounds, but it is actually a remarkably strong three-dimensional structure. When you get on your bike, your weight is pressing on the hubs, which stretch some spokes slightly more and others. slightly less. If you weigh 60 kg (130 lb), you will have to push about 30 kg (130 lb). down on each wheel (not counting the bike’s own weight), and the spokes. this is what prevents wheel warping.

Since each wheel has a couple dozen spokes, you might think that each spoke should only support a fraction of the total weight. maybe only 1-2 kg (2.2-4.4 lb) if there are 30 spokes, which can be done easily. In fact, the spokes do not carry the load evenly: the few spokes that are close to the vertical carry much more load than others. (There is still debate among cyclists about how the load is actually perceived and whether it is better to imagine a bicycle hanging on the spokes at the top or pressing on the spokes at the bottom.) How the wheel spins. the other spokes move closer to the vertical and begin to carry most of the load. The load on each spoke rises and falls sharply during each rotation of the wheel, so eventually, after many thousands of repetitive stress and strain cycles during which each spoke rapidly stretches and relaxes, one of the spoke (or its connection to the wheel or hub ) can fail due to metal fatigue. This instantly and dramatically increases the load on the remaining spokes, increasing the likelihood of their failure and causing a kind of domino effect, due to which the wheel sags.

How bike gears work

A typical bicycle has three to thirty different gears. toothed wheels are linked by a chain, making the car faster (in a straight line) or easier to pedal (uphill). Larger wheels also help to drive faster in a straight line, but this is a big drawback when it comes to hills. This is one of the reasons why mountain bikes and BMX bikes have smaller wheels than racing bikes. Not only do the gears on the bike help increase pedaling power when you go uphill: the pedals are attached to the main gear by a pair of cranks: two short levers that also increase power. that you can attach with your feet.

Gears can significantly affect your speed. On a typical racing bike, for example, the gear ratio (the number of teeth on the pedal wheel divided by the number of teeth on the back of the wheel) can be 5: 1, so a single pedal action drives you about 10 m (35 feet) down the street. Assuming you can only move your legs that fast, you can see that the gears effectively make you go faster, helping you move further with each pedaling.

Read more in our main gear article.

Image: Bicycles Before Gears: Early bicycles like these (known as “Penny Fartings” or “Tall Wheels”) had a huge front wheel that effectively increased your speed and allowed you to go very fast in a straight line. There were no gears: the front wheel spun once, when the legs were pushed up and down on the handles (pedals). It was rather difficult to go downhill (if you did not take your foot off the cranks), but uphill. almost impossible! Detail of the original 1887 painting by Henry “High” by Sandham, courtesy of the Library of Congress.

How bicycle brakes work

No matter how fast you move, there comes a time when you have to stop. The brakes on a bicycle work using friction (the force of friction between two objects that slide past each other as they touch). Although some bikes now have disc brakes (similar to those used in cars) with separate brake discs attached to the wheels, many still use traditional caliper and shoe rim brakes.

When the brake levers are pressed, a pair of rubber shoes (sometimes called blocks) are pressed against a metal inner rim at the front and rear of the wheel. When the brake pads rub firmly against the wheels, they turn. your kinetic energy (the energy you have because you walk together) into heat, which slows you down. Read more in our main article on brakes.

Rim brakes versus disc brakes

Caliper-driven rim brakes apply pressure to the outer edge of the wheel, where it rotates fastest, but with the least amount of force. This means that they require relatively little braking force to slow down. wheels (so they can be small and light), although you will still have to press hard and you will have to apply that force longer to get yourself and your bike to stop. One of the big disadvantages of rim brakes is that they are completely exposed to rain from the top and sides and splash from the wheels; if the brake pads and wheels are wet and dirty, there is significant lubrication, the friction between the brakes and the wheels can be up to ten times less than in dry conditions (according to David Gordon Wilson Cycling Science), and your stopping distance will be much longer.

Disc brakes work closer to the hub, so they need to apply more braking force, which can put stress on the forks and spokes, and are both heavier (which can affect the bike’s handling) and mechanically harder, but they tend to be more effective in wet conditions. weather and dirt.

Browse online bicycle forums and you will find a wide variety of opinions on which type of brakes are best for different types of bikes, terrain and weather conditions. Some people like disc brakes because they make the bike better; others love rim brakes because they are so simple and straightforward.

Figure: Disc brakes (simplified). When you press the brake lever, the cable or hydraulic line (yellow) acts on the calipers (blue), which press the brake pads against a disc called the rotor (red) attached to the wheel. Since the calipers are attached to one of the forks (gray) and the braking force must pass through the spokes (black) to stop the wheel, disc brakes put much more stress on the forks and spokes than on rim brakes.

How bicycle tires work

The friction between rubber tires also works to your advantage and the road you ride on: it gives you grip that makes your bike easier to control, especially on wet days.

Like car tires, bicycle tires are not made of solid rubber: they have an inner tube filled with compressed (compressed) air. This means that they are lighter and more resilient, which provides a more comfortable ride. Pneumatic tires, as they are called, were patented in 1888 by Scottish inventor John Boyd Dunlop.

Different bicycles have different types of tires. Racing bikes have narrow, smooth tires designed for top speed. (although their “thin” profile gives them higher rolling resistance), and mountain bikes have thicker and stronger tires with deeper tread, more contact with the road, and better grip (although, being wider, they create more air resistance).

Why clothes matter

Friction. great thing about brakes and tires, but it’s less welcome in another form: like air resistance that slows you down. The faster you go, the more resistance becomes a problem. At high speeds, racing a bike is like swimming through water: you can actually feel the air pushing you and (as we have seen) you spend about 80 percent of your energy overcoming resistance. Now the bike is nice to be thin and streamlined, but the cyclist’s body is much thicker and wider. cyclist creates twice as much drag as their bike. This is why cyclists wear tight neoprene clothing and pointed helmets to optimize and minimize energy loss.

You might not have noticed, but the handlebars of the bike. it is leverage. Likewise, the longer handlebars provide a lever to make the front wheel turn easier, but the wider you spread your arms, the more air resistance you create. This is why racing bikes have two sets of handlebars to give the rider the best, most streamlined pose. There are the usual, external steering wheel for steering and an internal one for holding Straight. The use of these inner handlebars forces the cyclist’s arms to be much tighter and more streamlined. Most cyclists now wear helmets for both safety and security reasons. aerodynamics.

Bicycles. this is physics in action

Let’s summarize briefly with a simple diagram that shows all of these different elements of loop science in action:

How to convert a mountain bike to a single speed bike

Hopefully my recent post, One Is Enough, convinced some of you to try your hand at solo mountain biking. The good thing about solo riding is that you can do it cheaply by retrofitting a bike you already own for less than 30! You can spend a lot more, but the basic conversion will only allow you to ride in one gear and is ideal if you just want to try a solo sport. Converting an old bike to SS. also a great way to breathe new life into it and finally get it out of the garage and hit the track again.

Riding my SS to help with the One Is Enough article. BrianW decided to convert his old 1991 Trek 830 into an SS. We’ve only done a basic rework on his bike, and that’s what this article is about. Future updates are included at the end, however if you want to do a full, bombproof conversion.

Yes, you can even convert a full suspension bike to an SS. you just need a special tensioner. I used Yess ETR-V to transform my Anthem for my first acquaintance with SS. I liked it so much that I ended up creating a special SS 29er hardtail and ditching Anthem.

Required details

Spacer kit. Get different sizes of spacers to fine tune the position of the rear gear for a truly straight chain line. Some cheaper kits only come with two spacers. i don’t recommend them.

Rear hub. if your hub has a steel hub casing (common on most low end bikes) a cheap stamped cog will do, but if your hub has an aluminum hub casing you should get a special SS cog with a wider base to prevent the hub casing from being squeezed out.

Tensioner. it keeps the chain in good condition and tightens and prevents it from falling. There is a small chance that you will not need it, but very small. Take one. you can always pick it up if it turns out that you don’t need it.

Chain. Most stainless steel rear cogwheels do not fit 9 prong chains, so you will need a stainless steel chain or 8 gear chain. If you are remodeling an old bike it may already have an 8-speed chain on it, so feel free to reuse this chain on your SS setup as long as it is not too worn out.

Some companies offer stainless steel conversion kits that include spacers, teeth and tensioner, which are easier and cheaper than buying the parts separately.

READ  How To Remove The Chain On A Speed ​​Bike

BrainW purchased Origin8 SS conversion kit that included multiple spacers, two gears and a tensioner.

A quick note on gearing: The gear ratio / combination you use depends on your skill level and where you live. Someone in Denver, Colorado probably needs lighter gear than someone in Savannah, Georgia. Ask in your area for recommendations.

bicycle, chain, speed

The tools you need

The conversion requires limited mechanical knowledge and only a few bike-specific tools. These are tools that every cyclist should own anyway, as they are essential for basic maintenance / replacement parts. This project. a good reason to get tools if you don’t already have them!

  • ruanbian and retaining ring tool. used to remove cassette with rear wheel.
  • Chain tool. you need to shorten the chain to the correct size.
  • Large adjustable wrench. used to rotate the retainer.
  • Various socket wrenches. used to remove the rear derailleur and derailleurs, install the tensioner, etc.

No more extra bits

It’s pretty simple, so I won’t go into details. Just remove all the parts you no longer need:

  • chain
  • front derailleur
  • rear derailleur
  • front derailleur
  • rear derailleur
  • all shift cables and housing

I won’t need this bullshit anymore.

Installing and Aligning the Rear Gear

Remove the rear wheel from the frame and the cassette from the hub. Use a whip chain to hold the cassette in place and a retaining ring tool and an adjustable wrench to remove the retaining ring. Once the cassette is off, it’s time to put on the rear gear and line up the chain line. You need to use a spacer to align the rear gear with the middle ring on the connecting rods. it will take a few tries to get it right.

Place the gear and spacers on the wheels where you think it might be close, but don’t pull the snap ring down too tight. Insert the wheel into the frame and run the chain across the gear and sprocket. Is it straight? Probably no. Remove the rear wheel and move the gear / spacers to get closer. Repeat as needed, and once you’re happy with it, tighten the retaining ring downward. You probably won’t be able to achieve 100% perfect results, but try to get as close to it as possible. A straight chain will run more smoothly, wear much more slowly, and are less likely to bounce off the chainring.

Nice straight chain.

Council. It is difficult to tell if the chain is straight just by looking at it; none of the frame tubes will be parallel to the chain, so it is difficult to visualize it. Here’s what I do: Place a ruler (I use a level) on the chainrings going back towards the rear wheel. If the chain is straight, it will remain at the same distance from the straight edge all the way back.

Straight edge makes it easy to tell if your chain is good.

Chain length and tensioner installation

We’re almost done! It’s time to shorten the chain to the desired length. Without a tensioner on the bike, wrap the chain around the middle chainring and rear gear. Figure out where you need to remove the excess chain. you want the chain to be as short as possible and then reconnect the remaining chain. Chances are the chain will be too long and you will have slack, but the tensioner is designed to do just that. If you’re lucky, the gear combination and chainstay length will fit perfectly and you won’t need a tensioner. But this is rare.

The chain on the BrianW bike didn’t line up perfectly, so I had to use a tensioner. When you shorten the chain, make sure to disassemble it in the right place so that you have a pair of outer links at one end and inner links at the other. impossible to connect two sets of external links!

The easiest way to install a tensioner is to remove the wheel pulley so as not to struggle with the chain. The tensioner should have a spring pin close to the switch suspension mount. this pin must be in the “hook” of the switch suspension. The pulley is usually adjustable, so you can adjust it according to the chain line.

Looking through the wheel, you can see the spring pin sitting in the derailleur suspension hook.

Some tensioners are designed to lower the chain, others. to lift the chain up, and some can work in any direction. A tensioner that pushes the chain upward is desirable because it forces the chain to wrap around the rear gear better, so more teeth engage the chain and there is less chance of chain slipping or falling. However, a decent tensioner that puts pressure on the chain will work too.

The Origin8 tensioner presses on the chain. This bike is ready to ride!

Ok, done! Ride and enjoy the ease of single skating.

To do everything

There are a few additional updates you can make to improve SS customization for long term use.

Chainring in stainless steel. The special stainless steel chainring will have no derailleur pins / ramps and will have taller and wider teeth than the derailleur ring. Higher / wider teeth are stronger and better grip on the chain, reducing the chance of chain slipping and dropping.

Wider SS cog. all conversion kits are supplied with rear teeth stamped from a flat piece of steel. They are thin and, under high load, can cut into the cassette housing on the hub, especially if it is a lightweight aluminum housing. True SS teeth are made from a large piece of metal and have a wider base to distribute the load and prevent damage to your expensive hubs.

Stainless steel sprocket bolt. these shorter bolts will allow you to remove the large ring from your crank. Less weight, more ground clearance and no exposed teeth to bump into your leg in an accident. And it looks nice and clean.

Old BrainW bike is now ready to hit the road again!

What to do if the chain comes off on a speed bike

A bicycle is a unique means of transportation. It does not pollute the environment, has a positive effect on the health of its owner, and allows you to experience physical activity in the fresh air. A bicycle is the first vehicle that a person gets in his life and for many it remains a favorite means of transportation for life. The most common problem faced by every cycling enthusiast is the chain flying off the bike. For what reasons this happens and what needs to be done to fix this problem, we will try to figure it out in this article.

Speed ​​bike problem

For a regular bike, this problem is easy to solve, but what to do if the chain jumps off on a speed bike? Among the most common causes of this problem are the following:

  • deformation of one of the stars. Gear shifting on multi-speed bicycles is carried out using cassettes consisting of several stars. These designs are collapsible and non-collapsible. Replacement of a damaged star is possible only in collapsible structures, if the structure is non-collapsible, its complete replacement is required.
  • Mistakes in the setting of the derailleur can cause the chain to fly off the bike when shifting gears. Gear shifting should be fine-tuned. If the bike owner himself cannot do this, you need to contact a specialist, or carefully study the instructions for setting the bike speed switch. The safety of the cyclist depends on the quality of this function.
  • Stretching the bike chain. This process is associated with long-term use of the chain, the application of high dynamic loads to it, irregular cleaning, due to which the residues of lubricants, mixed with dirt and dust, accumulate on the chain links. In this case, the chain must be shortened or replaced. To shorten the chain, you need to remove several links from it. This is done using a special squeeze tool. This simple tool is a must-have for every cyclist. With its help, the axle of the link (pin) in the lockless type bicycle chain is pushed out. If there is noticeable stretch on the bike chain, and the service life is long, it will be more advisable to replace it completely. To keep the chain in good condition, it must be periodically rinsed in kerosene and cleaned.
  • The curvature of individual chain links as a result of which the chain flies off the bike.

Loose chain tension on bicycles without gears

To eliminate the problem that has arisen, you need to understand why it has arisen and tighten the chain. This is done using special wrenches that every cyclist should have with them.

It is much easier to tighten the chain on a regular bike, in the case of a speed bike it will be more difficult. For successful repair work, when the chain falls off the bike without speeds, you need:

  • turn the bike upside down.
  • If the rear wheel is attached with an eccentric, then you need to loosen it a little, or not completely unscrew the nuts.
  • Adjust the desired chain slack.
  • Tighten nuts.
  • Check chain tension and quality of work.

Rear wheel deformation

Perhaps the problem is the deformation of the rear wheel. One of the most unpleasant cyclists’ problem is the so-called “eight”. “Eight” is the deformation of the wheel, violation of its shape and the inability to perform functions. This problem is eliminated by tightening and loosening the spokes with a special spoke wrench. To do this, the wheel is removed, the affected area is determined and the central spoke of the “figure of eight” is highlighted. Then the needles are pulled through one.

How to increase the tightness of the bike chain

The case with high-speed bicycles is much more complicated. How to chain a bike at speeds?

The transmission unit for bicycles with speeds, of which the bicycle chain is an element, consists of cassettes with several stars. Therefore, the repair work to eliminate chain slippage and sagging on such bicycles has its own nuances. To understand the causes of the problem, you must:

  • If the chain constantly flies on a high-speed bike, it is worth checking if the sprockets are not damaged. If one of the stars in the cassette unit is deformed, the chain can be thrown over another star to continue moving. But in this case, you need to understand that you cannot switch the speed. This method is suitable in order to get home for better repairs. To eliminate the damage, the deformed star will have to be replaced, and if the assembly is not collapsible and the entire cassette is malfunctioning, then it must be replaced.
  • the chain flies on a high-speed bike the reason is a failure to set the speeds. Check the quality of the setting. Very often, a failure in the speed setting will cause the chain to hit. The setting is made according to a special scheme.
  • After eliminating the root cause, the chain must be put back in place.

To properly fit the chain on a speed bike, you need to disconnect it using a squeeze. If you take a new chain, then you need to measure the required length, for which the chain is thrown over the large stars of the cassette blocks and connected, measuring the required distance. The excess piece of the chain is removed using a special squeeze tool. By turning the screw, the link axis is displaced and the unnecessary chain section is removed. Then the chain is passed between the speed switches and connected using the same tool.

If the chain flies on a children’s bike, then, depending on the design, the same actions are performed as with an adult bicycle.

A malfunction of the transmission unit on a high-speed bike can threaten the health and life of its owner, the cyclist can fly out of the saddle by inertia, so you need to remember to carry out preventive maintenance work on the chain, check the condition of the speed switch and the integrity of the main parts. It is especially important to carry out a technical inspection of your vehicle before starting the movement, in the event that you make long cycling and crossings. Timely diagnostics of your bike is a guarantee of safety.