Bicycle Brake Pads For Disc Brakes

Bicycle disc brake pads. Types of bicycle disc brake pads and their features

Brake pads are consumable items. One of the most demanded parts for bicycles and other vehicles. Replacing them is necessary once or twice a season or more often with intensive use of the bike.

bicycle, brake, pads, disc, brakes

Every time when replacing pads, a person faces the problem of choosing new pads.

In this article, let’s look at what pads for a bicycle disc brake are and how they differ.

Disc brakes are widespread, but there are also other types of bicycle brake systems: drum or tick-borne (vibrake). For them, the information from this article will not be useful (although sometimes pads for vibrating racks are made from similar materials).

So, there are two types of cyclists: those who carefully select the components and those who put on what will fit physically. Probably, the information will be useful for both those and others. Let’s start in order.

A bicycle disc brake includes a friction pair (most often a metal-non-metal), which is represented by a metal disc (or rotor) and non-metallic (there are also metal composites) brake pads.

When choosing new pads, you need to pay attention to the following important parameters:

What pads your rotor is designed for (unless of course you plan to replace it)

What standard of pads is used now. dimensional characteristic

What material is used for the pads currently installed on the bike

Let’s go through each of the points in detail.

Bicycle disc brake rotor and pad compatibility

Rotors can be made from different materials and have different coatings. There are also combined rotors (using a spider to dissipate heat and lighten the structure). Some rotors are considered universal and some are only suitable for certain types of pads.

For example, if the rotor has the inscription Resin PAD Only, then the rotor can only be used with soft organic pads (a little further describes what organic pads are). The disc material in this case is softer and more viscous, which will not have a particularly good effect on the durability of the part and the quality of braking in the case of using hard pads.

There is one more problem. if the disc is soft and the pads are too hard, the metal will “wrap” on the surface of the pads and spoil the frictional properties of the pads.

When choosing pads, consider the characteristics of your rotor. This information is usually extremely difficult to obtain. Especially when it comes to no-name Chinese iron.

There are more sophisticated ways, for example, to measure the hardness of a disk and thereby determine what kind of material it is. But the method is very complicated, and such accuracy is rarely necessary.

Before we continue the discussion, we need to remember what brake modulation is. This characteristic is often found in articles and forums. Often, well-trained cyclists are clever, throwing complex terms at a beginner.

So, brake modulation is the brake’s ability to respond to pressing force. They pressed the handle harder. they slowed down harder. This characteristic is not always linear and does not always correspond to the described pattern. On the contrary, some pads, with strong pressure, stop responding to an increase in the pressing force of the handle, and on cheap materials they may begin to slip altogether. Accordingly, the type and material of the pads directly affect the modulation of the brakes.

Pads standard and dimensional characteristics

Different brake pads are used for different brake machines. This is nothing new. It’s good when a manufacturer uses the same consumables for the entire line of its products. Then there will be no problems with the selection of pads.

All pads are of different sizes. You can choose similar ones either based on the markings on the pads, or by the type of brake system used, or by directly measuring your pads and choosing the same.

The range of sizes of disc brake pads is huge.

It is important to understand that 100% dimensional compliance is required. A deviation of a few millimeters can already make the use of the part impossible.

It will also be useful for you to read the following articles on our project:

What types of disc brake pads are there?

Here we come to the most interesting part of the article. Now we will look at the materials from which the pads are made. In total, there are several types now: organic pads, ceramic pads (often called organic, although in essence they are), semi-metallic, sintered metal.

They differ in the friction material (friction materials are a group of materials developed specifically to increase friction in a friction pair), which is applied to rigid equipment.

Organic Pads (Resin PAD)

In these pads, the friction material is represented by a composite consisting of metal shavings (or, more correctly, metal inclusions), which are immersed in a special compound. There are no more than 30% of such inclusions in the composition of the composite. The compound can be organic resins, high temperature resistant materials, rubbers or other soft materials. Often referred to as Resin PAD.

Characteristics

  • They wear off relatively quickly, but at the same time have high braking efficiency.
  • They do not cope particularly well with bad weather conditions. If liquid or dirt gets in, dry regularly. In bad weather, they lose the lion’s share of efficiency.
  • Possess high modulation (due to their overall high softness). One of the best indicators among all types.
  • Used with rotors that do not have strong protrusions and notches. the saw rotor will easily grind such pads into powder in a couple of weeks.
  • Not recommended for heavy cyclists.
  • Not recommended for e-bikes or e-scooters.
  • Very quickly rub in.
  • Have a shorter service life.
  • With the correct selection of the friction pair, the rotor-shoe is practically silent.
  • It is quite difficult to clean such pads from contamination. you need to ignite the pads with great care (read the article on what to do if oil gets on the pads), and washing them does not always help. Therefore, cleaning must be approached carefully. Annealing can destroy the non-metallic compound.

Sintered metal pads. inorganic pads (Sintered PAD)

The pads are made of metal chips or shavings, which are pressed into briquettes and sintered. Metals are used both homogeneous and dissimilar. Metals such as copper or high carbon steel are used. Modifying additives are sometimes used, for example, graphite. The purpose of such supplements is varied. In particular, soft graphite sometimes eliminates rotor scoring.

Characteristics

  • Works well in any weather. They do not lose their effectiveness neither in the rain nor in the snow.
  • They rub for a long time
  • Medium modulation. the pads are firm and do not fit well.
  • Should only be used with a suitable rotor. The rotor for rubber pads will wear out quickly and brake grooves will appear on it, which will not allow the pads to fit tightly to the rotor, which means that the braking efficiency will decrease.
  • They have low braking performance. They work stably in any weather, but require more pressure on the handle. Have slightly longer stopping distances.
  • Does not require constant drying.
  • Even with the correct selection of a rotor-shoe pair in bad and frosty weather, they often scream.
  • Have a high resource.
  • Suitable for heavy cyclists and highly loaded bicycles. heavy bikes or e-bikes.
  • Can be easily cleaned from any contamination both by calcination and mechanical cleaning methods.

Semi-Metallic Pads

The composition of the friction clutch here does not differ from organic, but the quantitative composition has been changed. up to 65% of metal inclusions are allowed. They are still immersed in a special heat-resistant resin or other binder.

Characteristics

Traditionally, semi-metallic pads are considered to be a compromise between organic and inorganic. They have the advantages of one kind and are devoid of the disadvantages of another. In particular, they:

  • Less noise than inorganic, but at the same time have better modulation.
  • They brake more effectively than sintered pads, but wear out more slowly than organic.
  • Rub in faster.
  • Works with all types of rotors, except for explicit saw rotors.
  • Adequately react to changing weather conditions.
  • Need to ignite with great care.

Ceramic pads (Ceramic)

Quite a rare occurrence in the cycling industry, but occasionally occur. They are relatively expensive. The friction material here is represented by ceramic with friction properties.

Characteristics

  • Requires the use of a dedicated rotor.
  • They do not take small blows. The clutch can crumble.
  • They quickly get washed out in the mud. Work poorly when weather conditions change.
  • They rub for a long time.
  • Have the largest resource of all types of pads.
  • They are expensive and not widely used. Originally came to cycling as a pro weapon and not particularly well suited for everyday use.

We took a look at the basic types of bicycle disc brake pads and their features. Each type of pad has its own advantages and disadvantages. Of course, each type has both fans and haters. Which one to prefer you need to decide on your own. There is no definite answer to this question. some pads behave well in one situation, while others in another.

The trade-off between these characteristics is only your choice, which should be based on personal preference and common sense.

In practice, it is often convenient to use one type of shoe on one wheel and the other on the other. So, sometimes it is very convenient to install sintered metal pads on the rear brake, so more dirt will get on it and the load is higher there, and put organic matter on the front.

It is useful to try to use both one type of pads and another, and based on personal experience, make a final conclusion.

What are bike brake pads and their maintenance?

Every cyclist dreams of having his two-wheeled servant ride as light as possible and pick up speed as quickly as possible. The speed indicator, undoubtedly, has a huge weight, but the bike must be stopped clearly and in time. And if the dynamics of movement depends on many factors, for example, type, weight and dimensions, then an effective braking system provides a quick and smooth decrease in speed.

Brake pads: how they work

Brakes operating on the principle of clamping a moving wheel are widely used on bikes. There are also foot (pedal) brakes, but you can find them, perhaps, on Soviet-made greats and on some representatives of the “road” suit. In general, the phrase “bicycle brake” almost always implies a set of several parts: a clamping claw, a cable, a body on which the pressure elements are fixed.

Brake pads for a bicycle serve as a deceleration tool: when you press the starting handle (claw), the cable is pulled out and causes the body to contract. As a result, the pads come together and reach the rim. The deceleration time and the amount of braking distance directly depend on the pressing force: the sooner the pads “grab” the rim, the faster the bike will take a stationary position. In especially unpleasant cases, with a sharp blocking of the front wheel, a cyclist can even fly over the steering wheel of his vehicle, so you also need to use the brake wisely.

READ  How to Mount the Rear Wheel on a Speed ​​Bike

A little higher we talked about the so-called rim braking system. Disc brakes are widespread, where the rim is not the working surface, but a metal disc located in the center of the wheel. In motion, the disc rotates synchronously with the entire wheel, due to which, in fact, a decrease in speed is achieved when it is compressed by the pads. Depending on the drive and installation location, they are divided into mechanical and hydraulic, front and rear, respectively.

As for the rim brakes, these are well-known V-breaks, as well as cantilevers and pliers. All of these systems act directly on the wheel rim through the pads and can be installed on both wheels or separately on each as an additional brake. The price of such devices is significantly lower in comparison with the for disc mechanical and, moreover, hydraulic brakes, and it is much easier to install them.

“Stop! some cyclists will say. but what about the division by material? ” Indeed, pads can be made of metal or rubber. precisely, in representatives of the first type, the braking surface is metallic, in the second, it is organic.

Metal brake pads. products obtained by sintering metal-containing substances. Organic does not contain metal impurities, but is a mixture of organic fillers and a binder. an elastomer. Depending on the amount of the latter, their hardness is determined: the more rubber, the softer the pads. Speaking about the material of elastomeric-organic linings, we do not take into account the frame. it is metal by default.

Both types have their advantages and disadvantages. Let’s see where they are superior and where they are inferior to each other.

Disc brake pads for a bicycle: varieties and tips for choosing

The brakes are without a doubt the most important part of the bike. A well-tuned braking system is the key to safe driving and a prerequisite for driving at high speed. And brake pads are the most important part of the braking system, since they determine the efficiency of its operation, and this is especially true in wet weather.

Features:

Disc brakes first gained popularity in mountain bikes as they offer superior stopping power in all weather conditions. But now they can be seen on all types of bikes. from racing bikes designed for tough workouts to walking city bikes.

Bicycle disc brakes can be mechanical (they use cables) and hydraulic, in which the cables are replaced with hydraulic fluid. The braking performance of hydraulic and mechanical disc brakes is practically the same. Both the first and the second do an excellent job with their tasks. Two factors have a much greater influence on braking power:

  • brake pads (material and dimensions);
  • rotor diameter.

Before choosing disc brake pads, there are a number of factors to consider. There are many different options for both road and mountain bikes.

Of all this variety, it is necessary to choose a block that will not only match the caliper of a particular bike in shape, but will also be made of material that takes into account the needs of the user.

The form

The pads can be round, rectangular and square. It depends on the design of the caliper. Different calipers have different shapes and different ways of holding the pads in place. It goes without saying that the shape of the pad must match the shape of the caliper. The easiest way is to look at what the brakes are called (usually it is written on the caliper) and choose the pads of the same model. If the exact same model could not be found, you need to remove the original pads and compare their shape with the form of the intended replacement.

Material

All pads are made by mixing various powdered components with a binder and then pressing this mixture at high temperatures and pressures. The greatest influence on the properties is exerted by the composition of the powdery components. These can be organic fibers or metal particles. Therefore, all pads are divided into three categories:

  • organic;
  • metal,
  • semi-metallic.

Each category has its own advantages and disadvantages. There is no perfect brake pad to fit every bike.

Organic pads are made up of rubber, carbon or kevlar fibers and resin is used as a binder. Metal (they are also called sintered) consist of metal particles (most often copper chips are used), sintered under high pressure. Semi-metallic have an organic base to which metal components are added.

The difference in composition determines different properties. Organic pads are softer, brake effectively and quiet enough. According to the results of comparative tests, they have a higher braking torque (about 10% higher) than metal ones, while the braking time is about 9% less.

However, on long descents, organic pads perform much worse than metal pads, as at high temperatures the binder melts and all material wears out quickly. In addition, they do not brake well on wet roads. Metal pads handle heat much better than organic pads, perform well when wet, but are noisy.

Pros and cons of each type

It is impossible to determine what the block is made of by its appearance. It is necessary to study the product description or information on the packaging.

Metallic

Pros:

  • the most durable;
  • can withstand very high temperatures;
  • the working surface is not subject to melting;
  • very effective when driving at high rpm, which is important, for example, on steep descents.

Minuses:

  • the lapping process can take a very long time;
  • high temperatures can change the working properties of mineral oils in the hydraulic system;
  • weak initial bite;
  • can be quite noisy.

Organic

Pros:

  • quick lapping;
  • good initial bite and modulation;
  • less noisy;
  • transfer less heat to mineral oil systems.

Minuses:

  • the service life is shorter than that of metal, especially when used in wet weather;
  • less efficient at high revs;
  • work surface can be sintered.

Semi-metallic

Pros:

  • combine the advantages of metal and organic pads;
  • good efficiency at high speeds;
  • good initial bite and modulation;
  • durable enough.

Minuses:

  • the working surface can be sintered;
  • different brands may have different ratios of metal and organic components;
  • higher price.

Bicycle brake pads: types, purpose, installation

A good braking system on a bicycle is the key to safety. But not everyone knows what braking systems exist, how they are installed and work.

One of the most important components of the braking system is the pads. Let’s take a closer look at what they are.

Bicycle Brake Pads

The pads are an integral part of the entire braking system. They can differ from each other in shape, appearance, can be made of different materials, and so on.

How can everyone not get confused in this and choose what they need? The answer is quite simple, first you need to figure it out.

In order to choose pads, you need to answer a few simple questions:

  • Which bike will they be installed on? If this is a walking, children’s or amateur bike, then there is no need to buy the most expensive and high-quality brakes.
  • What kind of braking system is installed on the bike? Pads come in different shapes and sizes depending on the brakes.
  • How often is the bike used and under what conditions? There really is a difference, because it is one thing to ride to the river several times a year, and quite another to ride in snow and rain on slippery mountain paths.

Purpose

Pads are the so-called consumable resource, which performs braking under the action of friction of the pad itself against the inner part of the wheel (rim) or the rotor. The resource is consumable, as they wear off over time, which means they need to be changed. But in order to understand everything in detail, it is necessary to consider the principle of operation.

Operating principle

Let’s consider the principle of action in stages and as simple as possible. With a bike with a good braking system, the principle can be easily seen and understood.

  • By pressing the brake lever, the brake cable sets in motion a special mechanism.
  • The mechanism is quite simple; when the cable is pulled, it begins to adhere more tightly to the brake surface of the rim (for V-brakes) or the rotor (in disc brakes). Surfaces that fit snugly are the very pads.
  • At the last stage, they begin to adhere tightly to the surface and slow down the rotation of the wheel. The tighter the rope is pulled, the stronger the friction, which means the faster the wheel stops.

Brake types

Having understood what brake pads are and how they work, you can move on to different types of brakes.

There are three of them:

  • Drum.
  • V-brake.
  • Disk.

It should be said right away that finding a bicycle with drum brakes is now very difficult. Their work is completely different, so the work of the other two types.

Yes, the same pedal braking with which many are familiar from childhood. It is very incomplete and expensive to repair, so there is practically no point in considering it. If anyone installs it, it is often experienced cyclists who love “Old school”.

V-brake

These brakes are the most popular and are fitted to most bicycles. It is quite cheap and simple, but reliable at the same time.

V-brakes are most often installed on city, children’s, and also budget bicycles. Everything is clear here, on such bicycles the speeds are not very high, sharp braking is very rarely necessary, and most importantly, the brakes are not used so often and wear out for a long time.

Let’s consider the main components of this mechanism:

  • Brake handle. Installed on the steering wheel and starts the entire system.
  • Cable. Transmits tension and converges levers.
  • Levers. Mounts to the front fork (front) and chain stays (rear).
  • Brake pads. Attached to the levers and in direct contact with the braking surface.

As you can see, the mechanism is very easy to use and maintain. The pads here are oblong. Most often they are made of special dense rubber, which is fixed on a dense iron or plastic base.

Disc brakes

Such systems are less common, but you can still see them very often. They are more complex, more expensive, but more durable and reliable. They are more difficult to install and configure.

They are installed most often on expensive models, as well as on road and other sports bikes (but not always, any type of brakes can be installed on any bike, if you choose the right sizes).

Let’s consider the main components of this mechanism:

  • Handles and cables. Everything here is exactly the same as on V-brale.
  • Brake disc (rotor). Attaches to the hub with 6 bolts.
  • Adapter. Serves as a mechanism to secure the caliper to the frame.
  • Caliper. The actuator that drives the pads.
  • Pads. The disc is pressed, as a result of which braking occurs. In this system, they are rounded.

Installation and adjustment of brakes on a bicycle: instruction

The installation process is not complicated, but very responsible. If you cannot configure everything yourself, then it is strongly recommended to contact the wizard.

The installation process depends on the type of brake system.

Let’s consider each separately:

V-brake

  • We install the handles on the steering wheel. We choose the most convenient place and fix it firmly.
  • We stretch the cables and insert the levers into the designated grooves. Fixing firmly.
  • We press the levers to the brake surface and fix. It is important that the distance from the pad to the rim is 1-3mm.
  • We check the performance.
  • Note. Before installing the levers, it is better to lubricate the grooves with oil; levers should be at the same distance from the rim for even wear.

Disk

  • We attach the brake levers to the steering wheel.
  • Install the caliper to the attachment point.
  • We attach the rotor to the hub.
  • We draw a cable from the handle to the caliper.
  • Insert the pads into the caliper and fix them.
  • We adjust the position of the pads using special bolts. Their distance should be 1 mm.
READ  Bicycle Rear Wheel Brake Adjustment

Summing up, I would like to say that the purchase and installation of braking systems is not the easiest process. In order to purchase the required model, it is best to consult with the sellers.

Brake pads for bicycle disc brakes. What are bike brake pads and their maintenance?

Every cyclist dreams of having his two-wheeled servant ride as light as possible and pick up speed as quickly as possible. The speed indicator, undoubtedly, has a huge weight, but the bike must be stopped clearly and in time. And if the dynamics of movement depends on many factors, for example, type, weight and dimensions, then an effective braking system provides a quick and smooth decrease in speed.

Brake pads: how they work

Brakes operating on the principle of clamping a moving wheel are widely used on bikes. There are also foot (pedal) brakes, but you can find them, perhaps, on Soviet-made greats and on some representatives of the “road” suit. In general, the phrase “bicycle brake” almost always implies a set of several parts: a clamping claw, a cable, a body on which the pressure elements are fixed.

Brake pads for a bicycle serve as a deceleration tool: when you press the starting handle (claw), the cable is pulled out and causes the body to contract. As a result, the pads come together and reach the rim. The deceleration time and the amount of braking distance directly depend on the pressing force: the sooner the pads “grab” the rim, the faster the bike will take a stationary position. In especially unpleasant cases, with a sharp blocking of the front wheel, a cyclist can even fly over the steering wheel of his vehicle, so you also need to use the brake wisely.

A little higher we talked about the so-called rim braking system. Disc brakes are widespread, where the rim is not the working surface, but a metal disc located in the center of the wheel. In motion, the disc rotates synchronously with the entire wheel, due to which, in fact, a decrease in speed is achieved when it is compressed by the pads. Depending on the drive and installation location, they are divided into mechanical and hydraulic, front and rear, respectively.

As for the rim brakes, these are well-known V-breaks, as well as cantilevers and pliers. All of these systems act directly on the wheel rim through the pads and can be installed on both wheels or separately on each as an additional brake. The price of such devices is significantly lower in comparison with the for disc mechanical and, moreover, hydraulic brakes, and it is much easier to install them.

“Stop! some cyclists will say. but what about the division by material? ” Indeed, pads can be made of metal or rubber. precisely, in representatives of the first type, the braking surface is metallic, in the second, it is organic.

Metal brake pads. products obtained by sintering metal-containing substances. Organic does not contain metal impurities, but is a mixture of organic fillers and a binder. an elastomer. Depending on the amount of the latter, their hardness is determined: the more rubber, the softer the pads. Speaking about the material of elastomeric-organic linings, we do not take into account the frame. it is metal by default.

Both types have their advantages and disadvantages. Let’s see where they are superior and where they are inferior to each other.

Disc brake pads for a bicycle: varieties and tips for choosing

The brakes are without a doubt the most important part of the bike. A well-tuned braking system is the key to safe driving and a prerequisite for driving at high speed. And brake pads are the most important part of the braking system, since they determine the efficiency of its operation, and this is especially true in wet weather.

Features:

Disc brakes first gained popularity in mountain bikes as they offer superior stopping power in all weather conditions. But now they can be seen on all types of bikes. from racing bikes designed for tough workouts to walking city bikes.

Bicycle disc brakes can be mechanical (they use cables) and hydraulic, in which the cables are replaced with hydraulic fluid. The braking performance of hydraulic and mechanical disc brakes is practically the same. Both the first and the second do an excellent job with their tasks. Two factors have a much greater influence on braking power:

  • brake pads (material and dimensions);
  • rotor diameter.

Before choosing disc brake pads, there are a number of factors to consider. There are many different options for both road and mountain bikes.

Of all this variety, it is necessary to choose a block that will not only match the caliper of a particular bike in shape, but will also be made of material that takes into account the needs of the user.

The form

The pads can be round, rectangular and square. It depends on the design of the caliper. Different calipers have different shapes and different ways of holding the pads in place. It goes without saying that the shape of the pad must match the shape of the caliper. The easiest way is to look at what the brakes are called (usually it is written on the caliper) and choose the pads of the same model. If the exact same model could not be found, you need to remove the original pads and compare their shape with the form of the intended replacement.

Material

All pads are made by mixing various powdered components with a binder and then pressing this mixture at high temperatures and pressures. The greatest influence on the properties is exerted by the composition of the powdery components. These can be organic fibers or metal particles. Therefore, all pads are divided into three categories:

  • organic;
  • metal,
  • semi-metallic.

Each category has its own advantages and disadvantages. There is no perfect brake pad to fit every bike.

Organic pads are made up of rubber, carbon or kevlar fibers and resin is used as a binder. Metal (they are also called sintered) consist of metal particles (most often copper chips are used), sintered under high pressure. Semi-metallic have an organic base to which metal components are added.

The difference in composition determines different properties. Organic pads are softer, brake effectively and quiet enough. According to the results of comparative tests, they have a higher braking torque (about 10% higher) than metal ones, while the braking time is about 9% less.

However, on long descents, organic pads perform much worse than metal pads, as at high temperatures the binder melts and all material wears out quickly. In addition, they do not brake well on wet roads. Metal pads handle heat much better than organic pads, perform well when wet, but are noisy.

Pros and cons of each type

It is impossible to determine what the block is made of by its appearance. It is necessary to study the product description or information on the packaging.

Metallic

Pros:

  • the most durable;
  • can withstand very high temperatures;
  • the working surface is not subject to melting;
  • very effective when driving at high rpm, which is important, for example, on steep descents.

Minuses:

  • the lapping process can take a very long time;
  • high temperatures can change the working properties of mineral oils in the hydraulic system;
  • weak initial bite;
  • can be quite noisy.

Organic

Pros:

  • quick lapping;
  • good initial bite and modulation;
  • less noisy;
  • transfer less heat to mineral oil systems.

Minuses:

  • the service life is shorter than that of metal, especially when used in wet weather;
  • less efficient at high revs;
  • work surface can be sintered.

Semi-metallic

Pros:

  • combine the advantages of metal and organic pads;
  • good efficiency at high speeds;
  • good initial bite and modulation;
  • durable enough.

Minuses:

  • the working surface can be sintered;
  • different brands may have different ratios of metal and organic components;
  • higher price.

Types of bicycle disc brake pads and their features

Brake pads are consumable items. One of the most demanded parts for bicycles and other vehicles. Replacing them is necessary once or twice a season or more often with intensive use of the bike.

Every time when replacing pads, a person faces the problem of choosing new pads.

In this article, let’s look at what pads for a bicycle disc brake are and how they differ.

Disc brakes are widespread, but there are also other types of bicycle brake systems: drum or tick-borne (vibrake). For them, the information from this article will not be useful (although sometimes pads for vibrating racks are made from similar materials).

So, there are two types of cyclists: those who carefully select the components and those who put on what will fit physically. Probably, the information will be useful for both those and others. Let’s start in order.

A bicycle disc brake includes a friction pair (most often a metal-non-metal), which is represented by a metal disc (or rotor) and non-metallic (there are also metal composites) brake pads.

When choosing new pads, you need to pay attention to the following important parameters:

What pads your rotor is designed for (unless of course you plan to replace it)

What standard of pads is used now. dimensional characteristic

What material is used for the pads currently installed on the bike

Let’s go through each of the points in detail.

Bicycle disc brake rotor and pad compatibility

Rotors can be made from different materials and have different coatings. There are also combined rotors (using a spider to dissipate heat and lighten the structure). Some rotors are considered universal and some are only suitable for certain types of pads.

For example, if the rotor has the inscription Resin PAD Only, then the rotor can only be used with soft organic pads (a little further describes what organic pads are). The disc material in this case is softer and more viscous, which will not have a particularly good effect on the durability of the part and the quality of braking in the case of using hard pads.

There is one more problem. if the disc is soft and the pads are too hard, the metal will “wrap” on the surface of the pads and spoil the frictional properties of the pads.

When choosing pads, consider the characteristics of your rotor. This information is usually extremely difficult to obtain. Especially when it comes to no-name Chinese iron.

There are more sophisticated ways, for example, to measure the hardness of a disk and thereby determine what kind of material it is. But the method is very complicated, and such accuracy is rarely necessary.

Before we continue the discussion, we need to remember what brake modulation is. This characteristic is often found in articles and forums. Often, well-trained cyclists are clever, throwing complex terms at a beginner.

So, brake modulation is the brake’s ability to respond to pressing force. They pressed the handle harder. they slowed down harder. This characteristic is not always linear and does not always correspond to the described pattern. On the contrary, some pads, with strong pressure, stop responding to an increase in the pressing force of the handle, and on cheap materials they may begin to slip altogether. Accordingly, the type and material of the pads directly affect the modulation of the brakes.

Pads standard and dimensional characteristics

Different brake pads are used for different brake machines. This is nothing new. It’s good when a manufacturer uses the same consumables for the entire line of its products. Then there will be no problems with the selection of pads.

All pads are of different sizes. You can choose similar ones either based on the markings on the pads, or by the type of brake system used, or by directly measuring your pads and choosing the same.

The range of sizes of disc brake pads is huge.

It is important to understand that 100% dimensional compliance is required. A deviation of a few millimeters can already make the use of the part impossible.

READ  Than Hydraulic Brakes Are Better Than Mechanical Brakes On A Bicycle

It will also be useful for you to read the following articles on our project:

What types of disc brake pads are there?

Here we come to the most interesting part of the article. Now we will look at the materials from which the pads are made. In total, there are several types now: organic pads, ceramic pads (often called organic, although in essence they are), semi-metallic, sintered metal.

They differ in the friction material (friction materials are a group of materials developed specifically to increase friction in a friction pair), which is applied to rigid equipment.

Organic Pads (Resin PAD)

In these pads, the friction material is represented by a composite consisting of metal shavings (or, more correctly, metal inclusions), which are immersed in a special compound. There are no more than 30% of such inclusions in the composition of the composite. The compound can be organic resins, high temperature resistant materials, rubbers or other soft materials. Often referred to as Resin PAD.

Characteristics

  • They wear off relatively quickly, but at the same time have high braking efficiency.
  • They do not cope particularly well with bad weather conditions. If liquid or dirt gets in, dry regularly. In bad weather, they lose the lion’s share of efficiency.
  • Possess high modulation (due to their overall high softness). One of the best indicators among all types.
  • Used with rotors that do not have strong protrusions and notches. the saw rotor will easily grind such pads into powder in a couple of weeks.
  • Not recommended for heavy cyclists.
  • Not recommended for e-bikes or e-scooters.
  • Very quickly rub in.
  • Have a shorter service life.
  • With the correct selection of the friction pair, the rotor-shoe is practically silent.
  • It is quite difficult to clean such pads from contamination. you need to ignite the pads with great care (read the article on what to do if oil gets on the pads), and washing them does not always help. Therefore, cleaning must be approached carefully. Annealing can destroy the non-metallic compound.

Sintered metal pads. inorganic pads (Sintered PAD)

The pads are made of metal chips or shavings, which are pressed into briquettes and sintered. Metals are used both homogeneous and dissimilar. Metals such as copper or high carbon steel are used. Modifying additives are sometimes used, for example, graphite. The purpose of such supplements is varied. In particular, soft graphite sometimes eliminates rotor scoring.

Characteristics

  • Works well in any weather. They do not lose their effectiveness neither in the rain nor in the snow.
  • They rub for a long time
  • Medium modulation. the pads are firm and do not fit well.
  • Should only be used with a suitable rotor. The rotor for rubber pads will wear out quickly and brake grooves will appear on it, which will not allow the pads to fit tightly to the rotor, which means that the braking efficiency will decrease.
  • They have low braking performance. They work stably in any weather, but require more pressure on the handle. Have slightly longer stopping distances.
  • Does not require constant drying.
  • Even with the correct selection of a rotor-shoe pair in bad and frosty weather, they often scream.
  • Have a high resource.
  • Suitable for heavy cyclists and highly loaded bicycles. heavy bikes or e-bikes.
  • Can be easily cleaned from any contamination both by calcination and mechanical cleaning methods.

Semi-Metallic Pads

The composition of the friction clutch here does not differ from organic, but the quantitative composition has been changed. up to 65% of metal inclusions are allowed. They are still immersed in a special heat-resistant resin or other binder.

Characteristics

Traditionally, semi-metallic pads are considered to be a compromise between organic and inorganic. They have the advantages of one kind and are devoid of the disadvantages of another. In particular, they:

  • Less noise than inorganic, but at the same time have better modulation.
  • They brake more effectively than sintered pads, but wear out more slowly than organic.
  • Rub in faster.
  • Works with all types of rotors, except for explicit saw rotors.
  • Adequately react to changing weather conditions.
  • Need to ignite with great care.

Ceramic pads (Ceramic)

Quite a rare occurrence in the cycling industry, but occasionally occur. They are relatively expensive. The friction material here is represented by ceramic with friction properties.

Characteristics

  • Requires the use of a dedicated rotor.
  • They do not take small blows. The clutch can crumble.
  • They quickly get washed out in the mud. Work poorly when weather conditions change.
  • They rub for a long time.
  • Have the largest resource of all types of pads.
  • They are expensive and not widely used. Originally came to cycling as a pro weapon and not particularly well suited for everyday use.

We took a look at the basic types of bicycle disc brake pads and their features. Each type of pad has its own advantages and disadvantages. Of course, each type has both fans and haters. Which one to prefer you need to decide on your own. There is no definite answer to this question. some pads behave well in one situation, while others in another.

The trade-off between these characteristics is only your choice, which should be based on personal preference and common sense.

In practice, it is often convenient to use one type of shoe on one wheel and the other on the other. So, sometimes it is very convenient to install sintered metal pads on the rear brake, so more dirt will get on it and the load is higher there, and put organic matter on the front.

It is useful to try to use both one type of pads and another, and based on personal experience, make a final conclusion.

Replacing brake pads on a bicycle

Both avid cyclists and novice amateurs have to deal with the need to replace the brake pads on bicycle transport. And practice shows that the more you pedal, the more often you should change the brake pads.

Bicycle brakes

It is the bicycle brakes that are responsible for regulating the driving speed of a two-wheeled vehicle and, in particular, for slowing down the speed of movement, as well as stopping. They can be of several types:

  • rim;
  • pedal (or drum);
  • disk;
  • steep;
  • and roller.

The most common ones used in most modern bicycle models are disc brakes and rim brakes.

Rim brakes

The operating principle of rim brakes is extremely simple. On the bicycle handlebar there is a brake lever, from which a special cable (or a hydraulic line is laid) is pulled to the brake pads located on both sides of the bicycle wheel rim. When the handle is pressed, the rim is compressed by the pads, after which the wheel rotation slows down and comes to naught.

There are two types of rim brakes, which in turn are subdivided into several subtypes:

  • Mechanical brakes including:
  • vector (V-brake or “vibrake”) with V-shaped attachment of the levers to the brake pads;
  • tick-borne (“crabs”) with U-shaped levers;
  • and cantilever (obsolete predecessors of V-brakes).
  • Hydraulic brakes, in which the applied force is transmitted from the handle to the pads by the brake fluid through a specially laid hydraulic line.

Rim brakes have a number of obvious advantages over other types of bicycle brakes:

  • Low loads on bushings and spokes.
  • Less braking heat.
  • Easy setup even in the field.
  • Low weight of the actual brake.
  • Not a high price at all.

Replacing rim brake pads on a bicycle

Over time, rim brake pads (like any other bike part) fail. And any self-respecting bike enthusiast, not to mention professionals, should be able to replace them. over, this is easy to do with v-brakes. The main thing is to do everything slowly, clearly observing the technological stages in the required sequence:

  • Open the brake. bring its levers together and remove the iron tip of the “shirt” from the groove formed (the cable comes out of it).
  • Remove old pads, remembering in which sequence the fasteners were used.
  • Install new pads, sequentially collecting all fastening pads and washers.

It’s even easier when it comes to cartridge pads! Only the rubber gaskets should be replaced. remove the locking pin, remove the old one and put a new gasket, and then fix it with the same (or new) split pin.

Care must be taken when changing v-brake pads as they can be left or right (the markings are directly on the pads). Then they should never be confused.

In addition, it is not enough just to change the pads, you also need to adjust them. And before that, check the brake cable for wear or breakage. He must be absolutely intact and easily move around in a “shirt”. It is also necessary to check the shape of the wheels so that there are no “eights”.

The brake pads must be correctly pressed against the wheel rim. And the pressure can be adjusted (adjusted) with the shoe fasteners. It is not difficult to get the desired angle if you hold down the brake and loosen the nut on each of the pads.

The v-brake cartridge pads should be located strictly horizontally, touching their entire surface to the rim, but not touching the tire. And when the required position is reached, you should fix it with a shoe nut. Regarding conventional brake pads, the rear of the pads must first come into contact with the rim horizontally.

During the tuning process, you must also ensure that the brake levers come together equally. Position adjustment is possible with a Phillips spring tension screw. If the lever barely moves, then the screw should be tightened, and when the lever moves too easily, unscrew.

Instructions for setting up the V-brake system. in the video review :. Disc brakes

A bicycle disc brake is a combination of a steel disc (rotor) located on a hub with a caliper. a device that actually clamp the disc with the brake pads. From the brake lever on the handlebar, the force is transmitted to the brake by a cable (mechanical disc brake type) or through a hydraulic line (hydraulic disc brakes).

Bicycle disc brakes have their advantages too. They:

  • less clogging when driving;
  • can work without problems while driving on snow or mud;
  • as smoothly as possible (in contrast to rims) adjust the braking force;
  • do not react to slightly curved wheel geometry (small “eights” are not a hindrance for them);
  • do not affect the wear of the rim;
  • and do not require expensive maintenance.

Many bicycle disc brakes have only one moveable brake pad. The second is fixed statically relative to the frame structure. This greatly simplifies and reduces the cost of the caliper. But, however, as the cyclist wears out, he will have to tighten the brake pad, which is stationary.

Brake discs are standard sizes. These are 140, 160, 180, 185, 203 or 220 millimeters.

Replacing pads in disc bike brakes

There is a step-by-step guide to replacing worn-out disc brake pads:

  • First you need to remove the caliper and clean it if necessary.
  • Then remove the retaining ring or wiring so that the bolt does not unscrew.
  • Remove the boot (twist-on or snap-on, depending on the model). And if the bolt is dirty, then it must also be cleaned.
  • Remove old bicycle brake pads. Sometimes they can be easily removed, and in some models they need to be pryed off-tucked a little, freeing them from the L-shaped protruding grip.
  • Install new (organic or semi-metallic) pads. They should slide along the rotor, and the spring should not break out of its place.
  • Put the bolt, and then the caliper. To check, you must press the brake lever several times well. And make sure that the pads have settled correctly and correctly press the rotor.

Disc brake pads should be replaced if:

  • decreased braking force;
  • a brake “squeal” is heard;
  • or an unpleasant grinding noise is heard when the brake lever is pressed.

It is not safe to ride a bicycle with worn disc brake pads. In addition, the rotor (the steel brake disc itself) may fail. And this will already require a serious bike repair.

You will see step-by-step instructions for replacing brake pads on a bicycle with disc brakes in this video review: